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Código:HR 520 ENE-DIC 1953 - FEB-DIC 1954 ST [Colección Mario Sotillo]
Ubicación:UCSP - Sucre
Autor Personal:Sky Publishing Corporation
TítuloSky and telescope
Ciudad: Cambridge, Mass.
Editorial: Sky Publishing Corporation
Año: 1953
Descripción:páginas; 59-87 il. 30 cm.
Notas:F.I. 21/07/2016
Palabras Claves:ASTRONOMÍA;
;
Términos Locales:Astronomía - Revista;
Idioma: Inglés;
Encabezados Geográficos:

Código:HR 520 ENE-DIC 1953 - FEB-DIC 1954 ST [Colección Mario Sotillo]
100:Sky Publishing Corporation
245Sky and telescope
260:Cambridge, Mass.: Sky Publishing Corporation: 1953:
300:páginas; 59-87 il. 30 cm.
500:F.I. 21/07/2016
650:ASTRONOMÍA;
653Astronomía - Revista; Idioma: Inglés

Sky Publishing Corporation. Sky and telescope. -- . --Cambridge, Mass.: Sky Publishing Corporation: 1953. # Ingreso:1047604

   páginas; 59-87 il..30 cm..

JANUARY 1953 V. 12 Nº 3 COVER: A nignttime view of a 5-meter diameter parabolic antenna, which is used by J. G. Bolton (seen in the photograp) at Dover Heights, near Sydney, Australia, for the study of discrete sources of cosmic radio waves. Th estar background includes the Southern Cross, in the space between the reflector and the tower. The photograph was made with a Rolliecord camera, f/3.5 Xenar lens, and Super-XX film. The stars were photographed with an exposure of 45 seconds at f/4, with the camera focused at infinity. The focus was then advanced for the antenna, which was taken at f/11 using a flash. Photograph by Ken Nash. - ATTACK ON THE THIRD DIMENSION – Willy Ley - RADIO ASTRONOMY AT THE URSI ASSEMBLY – F. J. Kerr - COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAMS AND STELLAR EVOLUTION – Otto Struve - QUEEN OF THE UNTRAVELED SEAS – Leland S. Copeland - GRAPHIC TIME TABLE OF THE HEAVENS – 1953 – Maryland Academy of Sciences - Discussion by Paul W. Stevens - MARE IMBRIUM PHOTOGRAPH – Mount Wilson Observatory - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - Here and There with Amateurs - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Planetarium Notes - Southern Stars - Stars for January BACK COVER: The globular cluster M3, NGC 5272, in Canes Venatici, photographed with the 200-inch Hale telescope, three times enlargement. Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories photograph. --- FEBRUARY 1953 V. 12 Nº 4 COVER: A general view of Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton, California, looking toward the west. The huge dome of the new 120-inch reflector dwarfs the domes of the 20-inch, 36-inch, and 12-inch instrument. The blockhouse for the 120-inch coude spectrograph projects from the left side of the building in this view. Lick Obsevatory photograph. - THE 120-INCH TELESCOPE – Olin J. Eggen - SAH AND SOPDET – Gorge A. Davis, Jr. - RADIO ASTRONOMY AT JODRELL BANK – I – A. C. B. Lovell - G FORCES AND WEIGHT IN SPACE TRAVEL – Fritz Haber - THE COMING ECLIPSE OF EPSILON AURIGAE – Otto Struve - GRAPHIC TIME TABLE OF THE HEAVENS – 1953 - Discussion by Paul W. Stevens – Part II - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - In Focus - Letters - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Stars for February BACK COVER: A region of the Milky Way in Monoceros, Orion, and Gemini, reproduced from Plate 35 or the Ross-Calvert Atlas of the Northern Milky Way, published by the University of Chicago Press. --- MARCH 1953 V. 12 Nº 5 COVER: A motion picture record of bubble motion from an 0.55-pound tetryl charge detonated 300 feet below the water surface, showing the pulsations of the gas products. The cycle of the pulsations is in some ways analogous to the changes in Cepheid variables stars. From “Underwater Explosions,” by Robert H. Cole, with permission of the Princeton University Press. - PULSATING STARS – Otto Struve - RADIO ASTRONOMY AT JODRELL BANK – II – A. C. B. Lovell - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - Ameteur Astronomers - Book and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - Letters - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Stars for March BACK COVER: The total solar eclipse of eclipse of February 25, 1952, taken on the Naval Research Laboratory expedition, by Hagen and Hawkins. The three prints are from a single exposure of 1.5 seconds on Panotomic X. emulsion, using the Gardner camera at an aperture of eight inches and a focal length of 18 feet, The top picture shows the corona; the one at left below was printed to show underlying detail; the picture at right below was printed still more heavily to show the structure in the corona above the prominences. North is at the bottom and west on the left. Naval Research Laboratory photograph. --- APRIL 1953 V. 12 Nº 6 COVER: A photomicrograph of samples of meteoritic dust and other particles collected in Iowa by Warren J. Thomsen in the winter of 1951-1952. A human hair (diameter 40 microns) is shown in the upper left to give a scale of size. The clustering and stringing of the spheres is due to magnetism acquired from the gathering magnet and not fully lost during subsequent heating. The “glass” spheres were hand not picked from other samples and dropped into the magnetic material for purposes of comparison. The spheres of both kinds are believed to be extraterrestrial in origin. No attempt has been made to identify th nonspherical material. State University of Iowa photograph. - THE ANNUAL DEPOSIT OF METEORITIC DUST – Warren J. Thomsen - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - ASTRONOMY FROM THE SPACE STATION – Fred L. Whipple - THE HISTORY OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS – Otto Struve - THE OHIO STATE RADIO TELESCOPE – John D. Kraus - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Planetarium Notes - Southern Stars - Stars for April BACK COVER: NGC 4565, one of the largest and most beatiful of the edgewise spirals, with a dark absorbing lane in its equatorial plane, photographed with the 200-inch Hale reflector at Palomar Mountain. It is of type Sb, measuring about 15.0 by 1.1 minutes of arc, of integrated photographic magnitude 10.7. Herschel designated the galacy as 24; it is located in Coma Berenices at 12h 33m.9, +16´(1950 co-ordinates). South is at the right. Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories photograph. --- MAY 1953 V. 12 Nº 7 COVER: Using a ladder instead of a spaceship, American Museum of Natural History artista Robert Kane goes to Mars, to putt he finishing touches on one of the 14 new black-light murals at the Hayden Planetarium in New York City. When on exhibition, the murals are illuminated only by ultraviolet light. American Museum of Natural History photograph. - HAYDEN PLANETARIUM BLACK-LIGHT MURALS - A NEW TELESCOPE IN SCOTLAND – E. Finlay-Freundlich and Robert L. Waland - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - THE CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR SPECTRA – Otto Struve - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - Here and There with Amateurs - Letters - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Stars for May BACK COVER: The planet Mars, photographed with the 200-inch Hale telescope. Three of the pictures are in blue light; the image image in the lower right is in red light. Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories photograph. --- JUNE 1953 V. 12 Nº 8 COVER: Four portable reflecting telescopes built by James V. Lawrence, Flushing, N. Y., whose mountings, consisting principally of masonite, permit observing from th southern horizon to the zenith when operated as equatorials. The mirrors are 3-inch, 4-inch, 5-inch, and 6-inch, respectively. - THE DISTANCE SCALE OF THE UNIVERSE – I – Otto Struve - WILKIE OBSERVATORY – D. C. Dornberg - STUDENT OBSERVATORY OF DELTA CEPHEI – Peter van de Kamp - STONES FROM THE SKY? – Helmut Hecksher - NEXT YEAR´S FAVORABLE TOTAL ECLIPSE – Paul W. Stevens - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Southern Stars - Stars for June BACK COVER: The total solar eclipse of February 25, 1952, photographed at Khartoum, Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, by Dr. G. Van Biesbroeck, of Yerkes Observatory, University of Chicago, for the purpose of checking the Einstein shift of starlight passing the sun. The plate was exposed 1 ½ minutes through a yellow filter on Eastman 103a-E emulsion, with máximum sensitivity around 6500 angstroms, for which wave length the lens was computed. The print was made with a specially cut rotating sector to prucure proper rendition of both the bright inner regions and the faint outer extensions of the corona, which required a difference of 100 in exposure time. Note the fine structure of the fan-shaped polar spikes, and the very long equatorial streamers typical at sunspot mínimum. Photograph, courtesy National Geographic Society. --- JULY 1953 V. 12 Nº 9 COVER: Two garden sundials designed by H. Egger, Zurich, Switzerland. The one at the left is of double-cylindrical type with four projection centers situated halfway between the axis and the cylinder. At the right is a similar dial, with “daisies” furnishing the projection centers; these are located on the axis of each cylinder. These dials show standard time and dates of the month. - ABOUT SUNDIALS – H. Egger - THE GREEN FLASH AT SUNSET AND AT SUNRISE – T. S. Jacobsen - PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE SUN´S CHROMOSPHERE - THE DISTANCE SCALE OF THE UNIVERSE – II – Otto Struve - PHOTOGRAPH OF THE CORONA BOREALIS CLUSTER OF GALAXIES – Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories (See In Focus) - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - In Focus - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Planetarium Notes - Stars for July BACK COVER: A group of nearby galaxies in Leo, NGC 3185-87-90-93, showing different types of structure. North is at the right; the scale of the reproduction is about 1 millimeter to 4” 4. This is a 200-inch Hale telescope photograph, Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories. (See In Focus.) --- AUGUST 1953 V. 12 Nº 10 COVER: The famous compiler of the first catalogue of nebulae and clusters, Charles Messier (June 26, 1730-April 12, 1817), as painted by Desportes. Messier is shown here at the age of 40, about the time his first memoir and the catalogue were presented. Bernard Roy, conservator of the department of museums at Nantes, and former owner of this portrait and its companion of Madame Messier, describes a long notice, written by Messier and attached to the back of the of the picture, “This was a pleasant monument to human vanity, and the enumeration of all his titles.” The cover painting is shown here as it appeared before the portraits were restored by the Louvre, and is reproduced by courtesy of Mr. Roy. - MESSIER AND HIS CATALOGUE – I – Owen Gingerich - SOME DEMOSTRATIONS FOR THE CLASSROOM – William A. Calder - A SMALL PLANETARIUM IN DETROIT – Charles A. Lewis - FLAMING STARS – Otto Struve - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Southern Stars - Stars for August BACK COVER: The galactic nebula NGC 6618, M17, in Sagittarius, commonly known as the Omega nebula, photographed in red light with the 200-inch Hale telescope. The nebulosa is located at R.A. 18h 17m 9s, -16º 12´(1950); it measures 2 by 10 minutes of arc, and is at a distance of about 3,000 lightyears. North is at the left. Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories photo. --- SEPTEMBER 1953 V. 12 Nº 11 COVER: A photograph of the planet Jupiter, taken on September 14, 1951, at 9:33 Universal time, in blue light, with the 200-inch Hale reflector. The longitude of the central meridiano n Jupiter is 70º by System I and 291º by System II. The great red spot in Jupiter´s southern hemisphere appears as an oval in the upper left. South is at the top. Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories photograph. - THE NSF AND ASTRONOMY - HOW TO ESTIMATE THE BRIGHTNESS OF A STAR – Sergei Gaposchkin - MESSIER AND HIS CATALOGUE – II – Owen Gingerich - GALACTIC STAR CLUSTERS – Otto Struve - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - Here and There with Amateurs - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Stars for September BACK COVER: The Double Cluster in Perseus, h and Chi Persei, photographed with the 36-inch Crossley reflector, October 22, 1939, two-hour exposure with the aperture reduced to 24 inches. West is at the top. Lick Observatory photograph. --- OCTOBER 1953 V. 12 Nº 12 COVER: Drawings of the planet Mercury by P. Briault with a 15-inch refractor, made (top row) 1917, Dec. 11, 16, 21, 22; 1918, Jan. 27, 31; (middle row) 1918, Feb. 3, 5, 6, 7, 8; (bottom row) 1918, April 5, 6, 6, 9; May 22, 24, From Vol. VI. “Observatoires Jarry-Desloges: Observations des Surfaces Planetaires, “1918. (See In Focus.) - THE TRANSIT OF MERCURY – NOVEMBER 14, 1953 – Fletcher G. Watson - TIMING THE TRANSIT OF MERCURY - WHAT HAPPENS TO STAR CLUSTERS? – Otto Struve - THE WEATHER OUTLOOK FOR NEXT YEAR´S ECLIPSE – Edward M. Brooks - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - In Focus - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Southern Stars - Stars for October BACK COVER: The planet Jupiter in red and blue light, photographed at the coude focus (f/30) of the Hale reflector on October 24, 1952, at 7:21 and 7:41 UT, respectively. Satellite III appears above and to the right in both pictures, and its shadow shows on the planet´s disk. On the original negatives Jupiter is 1.3 inches in diameter. Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories photographs. (See In Focus.) --- NOVEMBER 1953 V. 13 Nº 1 COVER: The Sommers-Bausch Observatory of the University of Colorado, dedicated August 27th at the 89th meeting of the American Astronomical Society, houses a 100 ½-inch Bausch and Lomb refractor. Any of the five pairs of doors convering the slit in the aluminum dome may be electrically opened and closed without disturbing the others. The entrance to the observatory is to the right; the lecture romos is in the foreground, and offices are on the far side of the building. The architecture is adapted rural Italian, in the same style as of the building. The architecture is adapted rural Italian, in the same style as other buildings of the university. The view is to the southwest, across Boulder toward the Flatirons of the Rocky Mountain front range, with the campus below and to the right of the picture. University of Colorado photograph by Floyd G. Walters. - COLORADO CONCLAVE – C. M. Huffer - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - THE INTERNAL CONSTITUTION OF SOME STARS – Otto Struve - THREE WEEKS OF SYMPOSIA – I- Bart J. Bok - CONVENTION AT WASHIGTON – C. H. Holton - MESSIER 101 PHOTOGRAPH – Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories (See In Focus.) - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - In Focus - Letters - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Sky and Teacher - Stars for November --- DECEMBER 1953 V. 13 Nº 2 COVER: The aurora borealis, seen toward the southewest from Goose Bay, Labrador, at about 9 p.m. EST, on March 20, 1953. Sirius and Orion shine through the rapidly brightening lavender and green bands and draperies. M./S.gt. James H. Godsey, Jr. Who took this aurora picture and many others in this issue, writer that amateur photographers have opportunity to record the northern lights at Goose Bay at least once a month and sometimes for two or three nights in a row during the winter months. - A STARS IN ECLIPSE PLANNING – D. C. Whitmarsh - SOLAR ECLIPSE AND THE AURORA BOREALIS – Sydney Chapman and D. W. N. Stibbs - THE AURORA - Donald S. Kimball - WHITE DWARFS – I – Otto Struve - THREE WEEKS OF SYMPOSIA – II – Bart J. Bok - AMERICAN ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY GROUP PHOTOGRAPH - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Southern Stars - Stars for December --- FEBRUARY 1954 V. 13 Nº 4 COVER: One of the most versatile men of recent centuries, Mikhail Vasilevich Lomonosov (1711-1765) was famed as poet, astronomer, and chemist. His activites includes inventing astronomical instruments, reforming the Russian language, and serving as secretary of state to Catherine the Great. This portrait, by an unknown artista, now belongs to the University of Moscow. - THE STORY OF COSMIC RAYS – I- W. F. G. Swann - MERCURY TRANSIT – THE CONTACT TIMES – Joseph Ashbrook - COMPOSITE PHOTOGRAPH OF THE TRANSIT OF MERCURY - LOMONOSOV – Otto Struve - WHAT MAPS OF THE COMING ECLIPSE TELL US – Paul W. Stevens - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - Letters - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Southern Stars - Stars for February --- MARCH 1954 V. 13 Nº 5 COVER: An artist´s conception of the appearance of the sun, the outer corona, and the zodiacal light, as they might be seen from space or from the moon. The sun is not to scale; the unobserved part of the zodiacal ligth extends from the sun to a distance of about 25 degrees, but some of it may be detected by observers west of the sunrise line of the total eclipse of June 30, 1654. Drawing by Charles A. Federer, Sr. - HARVARD OBSERVATORY DIRECTOR APPOINTED - THE ZODIACAL LIGHT AND THE SOLAR CORONA – F. E. Roach and G. Van Biesbroeck - QUANTITATIVE SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATIONS – Otto Struve - AMERICAN STRONOMERS REPORT - THE STORY OF COSMIC RAYS – II – W. F. G. Swann - OBSERVING THE MESSIER CATALOGUE – Owen Gingerich - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Sky and Teacher - Stars for March FEATURE PICTURE: The region of the California nebula in Perseus, in hydrogen-alpha light, by W. W. Morgan, B. Stroemgren, and H. M. Johnson, Yerkes Observatory --- APRIL 1954 V. 13 Nº 6 COVER: On the shores of Hudson Bay, near Ft. Churchill, Canada, in the early morning hours during the summer of 1949, cosmic ray scientists regularly released strings of balloons to carry their recording apparatus as high as 20 miles into the upper atmosphere. Because of a joint project of the National Geographic Society and the Barlon Research Foundation of the Franklin Institute. - THE ORIGIN AND AGE OF METEORITES - STAR CHAINS – Otto Struve - MOVING THE GREENWICH OBSERVATORY - THE STORY OF COSMIC RAYS – III – W. F. G. Swann - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - THE SKY AT TOTALITY – Paul W. Stevens - FILMING THE TOTAL ECLIPSE – Peter A. Leavens - HOW TO FIND THE DATE OF EASTER – H. Herbert Howe - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Planetarium Notes - Southern Stars - Stars for April FEATURE PICTURE: The Milky Way in Cygnus and Cepheus, photographed by Frank E. Ross at Flagstaff, Ariz., October 14, 1930, with a 5-inch, f/7 Ross-Fecker camera, exposure time three hours. It is reproduced from Plate 18 of the Ross-Clavert “Atlas of the Northern Milky Way,” University of Chicago Presss --- MAY 1954 V. 13 Nº 7 COVER: A large shower of penetrating and cascade particles resulting from a cosmic ray encounter a short distance above the cloud chamber is shown here. The 14 lead plates are each 1.3 centimeters thick. In the uppermost section is a small collimated group of high-energy particles that cause of about 12 centimeters of lead, and with possibly about 100 particles at its máximum growth, the cascade must have had an original energy of about 10 billion electron volts. Note the striking display of heavily ionizing (lower energy) left of the main cascade. Photograph by William B. Fretter, University of California at Berkeley, with permission of the American Journal of Physics; caption material is from Cloud Chamber Photographs of the Cosmic Radiation, by Rochester and Wilson, Pergamon Press, Ltd. - AIR FORCE AND OTHER EXPEDITION PLANS - MARS CLOCK AND CALENDAR – I. M. Levitt - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - THE STORY OF COSMIC RAYS – IV – W. F. G. Swann - RED SHIFTS OF SPECTRAL LINES – Otto Struve - EVENTS ALONG THE SHADOW PATH – Paul W. Stevens - ECLIPSE ROAD MAP - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Sky and Teacher - Southern Stars - Stars for May FEATURE PICTURE: The ringed planet, Saturn, photographed by E. E. Barnard with the 60-inch Mount Wilson reflector, November 19, 1911. Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories photograph. --- JUNE 1954 V. 13 Nº 8 FRONT COVER: The coronagraph building of the High Altitude Observatory at Climax, Colo. At the right is the 20-foot cone-shaped dome housing the original 5-inch instrumenta, with which daily observations of the sun are made. The dome to the left is 50 feet in diameter, for a 16-inch coronagraph now under construction. Edwin Weber, an observer at Climax, is in the foreground. - CURRENT OBSERVING PROGRAMS FOR MARS - THE FORMATION OF THE SUN´S CORONA – Donald E. Billings - SPECTRA OF VISUAL DOUBLE STARS – I – Otto Struve - THE STORY OF COSMIC RAYS – V – W. F. G. Swann - SOME ECLIPSES OF HISTORY AND LEGEND – Ralph S. Bates - FRENCH ASTRONOMERS´ ECLIPSE PLANS – Sarah Lee Lippincott - ECLIPSE NOTES - MARS AND THE AMATEUR OBSERVER – Walter H. Haas - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - Here and There with Amateurs - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Stars for June FEATURE PICTURE: Photographs of Mars by Bernard Lyot in 1941, and an Antoniadi map of Mars, courtesy Audouin Dollfus and the British Astronomical Association, respectively. --- JULY 1954 V. 13 Nº 9 FRONT COVER: The Spitz Model B planetarium instrument, being tested before shipment to Uruguay, projects southern stars on the temporary dome of the laboratories, then in Philadelphia. The Southern Cross is seen at the top, left of the uppermost star globe. Stars to magnitude 5.8 are projected, but nota ll of the show in the picture. The instrument is suspended by cables. General Development Corporation photograph. - MORE ABOUT THE NSF AND ASTRONOMY - A MAJOR PLANETARIUM FOR URUGUAY – Robert R. Coles - SPECTRA OF VISUAL DOUBLE STARS – II – Otto Struve - THE CRATER OF TALEMZANE IN ALGEBRA – L. F. Brady - THE STORY OF COSMIC RAYS – VI – W. F. G. Swann - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Planetarium Notes - Sky and Teacher - Southern Stars - Stars for July FEATURE PICTURE: The planetary nebula NGC 7293, photographed with the Hale reflector in red light. Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories photograph. --- AUGUST 1954 V. 13 Nº 10 COVER: The 20-inch astrograph building atop Mt. Hamilton, Calif. The twintubed instrument may be seen through the slit opening. Lick Observatory photograph. - TOTAL ECLIPSE WEATHER IN THE UNITED STATES - HADARI w-al-WAZN – George A. Davis, Jr. - A MAGNIFICENT ECLIPSE - THE ECLIPSE FROM THE AIR – Helen Hughes - FIRST SERIES OF LICK SURVEY COMPLETED - THE ATMOSPHERES OF JUPITER AND SATURN – Otto Struve - Amateur Astronomers - Astronomical Scrapbook - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - Letters - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Stars for August FEATURE PICTURE: A series photograph of the eclipse of June 30th shows the partial phases and the corona during totality. Photograph by Roy Swan, courtesy the Minneapolis Star. --- SEPTEMBER 1954 V. 13 Nº 11 COVER: The corona of the sun, as it appeared at he total eclipse of June 30, 1954. The photograph by Roland Rustad, Jr., has been awarded first prize in the Sky and Telescope eclipse photograph competition. It was taken with a 3-inch f/13.3 refractor, motor driven during an exposure of three seconds. - ECLIPSE PHOTOGRAPH COMPETITION - MIRA CETI – Otto Struve - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - ECLIPSE REPORT AT MADISON - NOTES ON THE ECLIPSE - MADISON CONVENTION – Joseph A. Anderer - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - Here and There with Amateurs - Letters - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Sky and Teacher - Southern Stars - Stars for September FEATURE PICTURES: The winning pictures in the Sky and Telescope eclipse photograph competition comprise the pictorial feature this month. --- OCTOBER 1954 V. 13 Nº 12 COVER: The radio telescope at Harvard Observatory´s Agassiz station at Harvard, Mass. The 25-foot mirror, constructed by the D. S. Kennedy Company, is mounted equatorially. The funds for the equipment were provided by the National Science Foundation and by an anonymous friend of the observatory. This photograph was taken in the summer of 1954 by Walter R. Fleischer, of the Harvard University news office. - INTERNATIONAL ASTRONOMICAL UNION MEETINGS - RADIO STUDIES OF INTERSTELLAR HYDROGEN – Bart J. Bok - COSMIC DUST – Otto Struve - NOTES ON THE ECLIPSE – II - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - AMERICAN ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY GROUP PHOTOGRAPH - Amateur Astronomers - Astronomical Scrapbook - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Planetarium Notes - Stars for October FEATURE PICTURE: A portion of the Milky Way in Scorpius-Sagittarius, enlarged from a photograph made with the Baker-Schmidt telescope at Harvard Observatory´s Boyden station near Bloemfontein, South Africa. --- NOVEMBER 1954 V. 14 Nº 1 COVER: The main building of the Poulkovo Observatory, near Leningrad, as it looked in May of this year. The picture is from a Kodachrome by Jason J. Nassau. - THE DEDICATION OF THE NEW POULKOVO OBSERVATORY – Dirk Brouwer an Jason J. Nassau - EARLY DAUGHTERS OF URANIA – P. V. Rizzo - THE INTERACTION BETWEEN STARS AND NEBULAE – Otto Struve - THE MOUSE - STELLAFANE CONVENTION – 1954 - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - Amateur Astronomers - Books and the Sky - Gleanings for ATM´s - Letters - News Notes - Observer´s Page - Sky and Teacher - Southern Stars - Stars for November FEATURE PICTURE: The northwest portion of the Rosette nebula in Monoceros, including part of the star cluster NGC 2244. This is from a photograph with the 48-inch Schmidt telescope at the Palomar Observatory. --- DECEMBER 1954 V. 14 Nº 2 COVER: Ana erial view of Mount Wilson Observatory, near Pasadena, Calif. At the left are the 150- and 60-foot solar tower telescopes, and the horizontal Snow solar telescope. In the middle is the dome of the 60-inch reflector, and left of this the 6-inch refractor. At the right, the largest dome houses the 100-inch Hooker reflector, in front of this is the housing the 50-foot stellar interferometer. Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories photograph. - FIFTY YEARS AT MOUNT WILSON - PRINCIPLES OF THE ROCKET ENGINE – Frederick I. Ordway - THE CLOUDS OF MAGELLAN – Otto Struve - THE LUMINOUS SHOCK TUBE – A Tool for Experimental Astrophysics – Lawrence H. Aller - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS Variable Star Observers Meet in Rhode Island Sixth Annual Convention of Western Amateur Astronomers - ASTRONOMICAL SCRAPBOOK The Faintest Stars Visible - BOOKS AND THE SKY A Brief Text in Astronomy A History of the Theories of Aether and Electricity, 1900-1926 - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´S A 6-inch f/10 Springfield Refletor News from Belgium A Hint for Telescope Users - IN FOCUS - LETTERS - NEWS NOTES – Dorrit Hoffleit - OBSERVER´S PAGE Deep-Sky Wonders - STARS FOR DECEMBER FEATURE PICTURE: The Whirlpool nebula, M51, in the constellation of Canes Venatici, photographed with the Hale 200-inch telescope. Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories photograph.

Número Ingreso Código Base de Datos Ubicación Tipo # Ej. Status Devolución Reserva
1047604HR 520 ENE-DIC 1953 - FEB-DIC 1954 ST  Colección Mario Sotillo UCSP - Sucre Original 1Disponible  

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