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Código:HR 520 FEB-DIC 1940 - ENE-MAR/MAY-DIC 1941 ST [Colección Mario Sotillo]
Ubicación:UCSP - Sucre
Autor Personal:Sky Publishing Corporation
TítuloSky and telescope
Ciudad: Cambridge, Mass.
Editorial: Sky Publishing Corporation
Año: 1940-1941
Descripción:Varias paginaciones il. 29 cm.
Notas:F.I. 17/11/2016
Palabras Claves:ASTRONOMÍA;
;
Términos Locales:Astronomia - Revistas;
Encabezados Geográficos:

Código:HR 520 FEB-DIC 1940 - ENE-MAR/MAY-DIC 1941 ST [Colección Mario Sotillo]
100:Sky Publishing Corporation
245Sky and telescope
260:Cambridge, Mass.: Sky Publishing Corporation: 1940-1941:
300:Varias paginaciones il. 29 cm.
500:F.I. 17/11/2016
650:ASTRONOMÍA;
653Astronomia - Revistas

Sky Publishing Corporation. Sky and telescope. -- . --Cambridge, Mass.: Sky Publishing Corporation: 1940-1941. # Ingreso:1051152

   Varias paginaciones il..29 cm..

FEBRUARY, 1940 V. IV N° IV CONTENTS COVER: The constellations visible from 40° north at 9 oclock, February 15th. From barton and Barton Guide to the Constellations, Whittlesey House, new York PERKINS OBSERVATORY IS HOST TO AMERICAN ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY MORNING AND EVENING STARS William H. Barton, Jr THE SOLAR PARALLAX Breading G. Way PLANETS ON PARADE HELIOCENTRIC MAP OF PLANETS FOR FEBRUARY 28TH BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT SKY QUIZ Arthur L. Draper OBSERVER’S PAGE Robert G. Cox GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s Walter Howland Notes Robert R. Coles AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION TELESCOPE MAKERS AT HAYDEN PLANETARIUM SECOND ANNUAL CONVENTION SET FOR JULY IN PITTSBURGH JUNIOR ASTRONOMY CLUB TELESCOPIC OBSERVATIONS IN FEBRUARY PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: M33(N.G.C. 598) photographed by G.W. Ritchey with the Mt. Wilson 60-inch reflector. This well-known spiral nebula is in triangulum, between alpha trianguli and beta Andromedae R.A. 1h 30m. dec 30° 10’. It is about one degree in diameter. Second in appareny size only to the Andromeda nebula. An advanced type spiral, it contains condensations and granular nodules, and a comparatively faint nucleus. Mt. Wilson photo, courtesy revelation. MARCH, 1940 V. IV N° 5 CONTENTS COVER: The constellations visible from 40° north at 9 oclock, March 15th. The brighnesses indicated by the symbols on the chart are apparent visual magnitudes corrected for atmospheric absorption according to each star’s altitude at the time. From Barton and Barton Guide to the Constellations, Whittlesey House, new York ECLIPSE IN TEXAS Ottos struve EASTER – THE AWAKENING James Stokley WHEN THE SHAMROCK MEETS THE PALM AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES THE ANNULAR ECLIPSE Robert I. Wolff METEORS AND THE LIKE William H. Barton, Jr. GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s Walter Howland SKY QUIZ Arthur L. Draper BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION ASTRONOMY BY RADIO JUNIOR ASTRONOMY CLUB TELESCOPIC OBSERVATIONS IN MARCH OBSERVER’S PAGE Robert G. Cox NEWS NOTES Robert R. Coles PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: A spiral nebula in Ursa Major. Photograph of M81 (N.G.C.) taken at MT. EWilson observatory with the 60-inch telescope, exposure 4h 15m. Courtesy revelation. APRIL 1940 V. IV N° 6 CONTENTS COVER: The constellations visible from 40° north at 9 oclock, April 15th. The brightnesses indicated by the symbols on the chart are apparent visual magnitudes corrected for atmospheric absorption according to each star’s altitude at the time. From Barton and Barton Guide to the Constellations, Whittlesey House, new York THE PROBLEM OF NEPTUNE’S MOTION Dirk Brouwer A.A.V.S.O.TO MEET AT TORONTO WITH BYRD IN LITTLE AMERICA James stokley ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES ORIENTATION OF THE PYRAMIDS Bjorn Svenonius ECLIPSES, ANCIENT AND MODERN William H. Barton, Jr. THE CORONAVISER A.M. Skellett SKY QUIZ Arthur L. Draper BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s FOR $50 – A GOOD OBSERVATORY Richrad Leroy Shaner NEWS NOTES Robert G. Coles OBSERVER’S PAGE Robert G. Cox SOUTH CIRCUMPOLAR CHART AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION ECLIPSE EXPEDITION – APRIL 6-8 ASTRONOMY IN LOWA JUNIOR ASTRONOMY CLUB TELESCOPIC OBSERVATIONS IN APRIL PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: Brooks’ Comet, visible to the naked eye for four months in 1911, reached perihelion on October 27th that year. This object was very beautiful; its tail showed a number of delicate streamers. The photograph was taken by E.E. Barnard at Yearkes Observatory, on October 23, 1911. MAY, 1940 V. IV N° 7 CONTENTS COVER: The constellations visible from 40° north at 9 oclock, May 15th. The brightnesses indicated by the symbols on the chart are apparent visual magnitudes corrected for atmospheric absorption, according to each star’s altitude at the time. From Barton and Barton Guide to the Constellations, Whittlesey House, new York RING ECLIPSE REPORT Charles H. Coles ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES TRITON AND PLUTO R.A. Lyttleton GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s NOTES ON EARLY OPTICS Earle B. Brown THE SUN – EARTH’S POWERHOUSE James Stokley E PUR SI MUOVE William H. Barton, Jr. ECLIPSE SAGA George V. Plachy NEWS NOTES Robert R. Coles AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION TEXAS MEETING OF AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS THE PITTSBURGH CONVENTION JUNIOR ASTRONOMY CLUB TELESCOPIC OBSERVATIONS IN MAY BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood SKY QUIZ Arthur L. Draper OBSERVER’S PAGE EXPERIMENTS IN ECLIPSE PHOTOGRAPHY Peter A. Leavens ARTHUR L. DRAPER NEW DIRECTOR AT BUHL PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: The Whirlpool nebula in Canes Venatici, messier 51, photographed with the 100-inch. Hooker reflector at MT: Wilson Observatory, there hour exposure, May 15, 1926. This was the first of the nebulae to be distinguished as a spiral. It is N.G.C. 51945. R.A. 13h 26m. Dec 47° 43m. JUNE, 1940 V. IV N° 8 CONTENTS COVER: The constellations visible from 40° north at 9 oclock, June 15th. The brightnesses indicated by the symbols on the chart area apparent visual magnitudes corrected for atmospheric absorption, according to each star’s altitude at the time. From Barton and Barton Guide to the Constellations, Whittlesey House, new York HARVARD CORONAGRAPH IN COLORADO Donald H. menzel THE DOUBLE ORIGIN OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM Thomas S. Gardner MATHEMATICS AND ANCIENT ASTRONOMERS Edwin Waldrop A METEOR PHOTOGRAPHED FROM THE AIR Oscar E. Monnig WAVES FROM SPACE William H. Barton, Jr. ECLIPSE PICTURES FROM TEXAS PLANETS ON PARADE BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood THE UNIQUE MOON Arthur L. Draper AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION STELLAFANE ON AUGUST 10TH JUNIOR ASTRONOMY CLUB TELESCOPIC OBSERVATIONS IN JUNE OBSERVER’S PAGE LUNAR PHOTOGRAPHY FOR THE AMATEUR Robert G. Cox GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s NOTES ON EARLY OPTICS (concluded) Earlie B. Brown ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES NEWS NOTES Robert R. Coles BIOGRAPHY PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: The globular cluster in Hercules, messier (13 N.G. C.) 6205, is 35000 light year distant and coming towardthe earth with a speed of 265 kilometers per second. The photographe here was taken by Ritcher with the 60-inch telescope at MY. Wilson 11 hour total exposure, onthree nignts, june 6, 7 and 8. 1910. Tha scale on the picture is 1 – inch JULY, 1940 V. IV N° 9 CONTENTS COVER: The constellations visible from 40° north at 9 oclock, July 15th. The brightnesses indicated by the symbols on the chart are apparent visual magnitudes corrected for atmospheric absorption, according to each star’s altitude at the time From Barton and Barton Guide to the Constellations, Whittlesey House, new York SCORPION SKIES William H. Barton Jr. THE TIME SCALE OF THE UNIVERSE Henry Norris Russel GUSTAVUS WYNNE COOK James Stokley A CRITICISM OF THE DOUBLE ORIGIN OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM Roy K. Marshall THE MAGICAL SCHMIDT Charles H. Smiley A.A.V.S. MEETS AT TORONTO Dorrit Hoffeit ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES NEWS NOTES Robert R. Coles OBSERVER’S PAGE OCCULTATION OF VENUS Peter A. Leavens AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION PITTSBURGH CONVENTION PROGRAM COMPLETED ECLIPSE EXPEDITION TO BRAZIL JUNIOR ASTRONOMY CLUB TELESCOPIC OBSERVATIONS IN JULY BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s SCHMIDT CAMERA REPORT FROM STANLEY W. BROWER Earle B. Brown PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: the region of there ophiuchi (the bright star somewhat to the right of upper center) is rich in stars and nebulosity. Photo by Frank E. Ross, flagstaff Ariz. May 24, 1973, using 5-inch lens of 35-inch focal length, exposure 3h 20m. Instrument designed by Ross, construted by fecker, now the property of MT. Wilson. Scale of picture about 1 cm. = 36 coordinates of theta oph.. R.A. 17h 19 m, dec 24° 57’ the picture apperars as plate 3 in the ATLAS OF THE NORTHERN MILK WAY, by Frank e. Ross and mary R. Calvert ( univ. of Chicago, press, 1934 AUGUST, 1940 V. IV N° 10 CONTENTS COVER: The constellations visible from 40° north at 9 oclock, August 15th. The brightnesses indicated by the symbols on the chart area apparent visual magnitudes corrected for atmospheric absorption, according to each star’s altitude at the time. From Barton and Barton Guide to the Constellations, Whittlesey House, new York. WEATHER OR NOT William H. Barton, Jr. ASTRONOMY AT CENTRAL COLLEGE ECLIPSE ON HIGH J.A.Pierce BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood Robert R. Coles AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS CONVENE AT PITTSBURGH BREADING G. WAY Albert j. Brooks THE TIME-SCALE OF THE UNIVERSE – cocluded Henry Norris Russell ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s NEW SCHMIDT CAMERA WRINKLES, BY HERSCHEL C. ICE Earle B. Brown NEWS NOTES Robert R. Coles THE SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH ON METEORITES Frederick C. Leonard AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION JUNIOR ASTRONOMERS CLUB TELESCOPIC OBSERVATIONS IN AUGUST OBSERVER’S PAGE AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY OF THE PLANETS PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: The trifid nebula in Sagittarius m20 N.G.C. 6514, is a galatic nebule of the difuse type. This photo was taken with the 60-inch reflector at MT. Wilson, June 4 and 5, 1910, exposure 2h 26m. The 1910 coordinates of the object are R.A. 17h 56.3m. Dec – 23° 2’. MT. Wilson photo courtesy revelation. SEPTEMBER, 1940 V. IV N° 11 CONTENTS COVER: The constellations visible from 40° north at 9 o’clock, September 15th. The brightnesses indicated by the symbols on the chart area apparent visual magnitudes corrected for atmospheric absorption, according to each star’s altitude at the time. From Barton and Barton Guide to the Constellations, Whittlesey House, new York. STELLAFANE, 1940 George V. Planchy ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES TRANSIT OF MERCURY-OBSERVATIONS WANTED THE COPERNICANTHEORY Edward Rosen SKY CLOCKS AND CALENDARS William H. Barton, Jr CHEMICALNOMENCLATURE BORROWS FROM ASTRONOMY Herbert W. Cornell WHO ARE THESE AMATEURS? Charles h. Smiley ECLIPSE STUDIES – PAST AND PRESENT Ross W. Mararriott NEWS NOTES Robert R. Coles GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s THREE TESTS FOR SCHMIDT CAMERAS BY ARTHUR DEVANY Earle B. Brown BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION A.T.M.’s SIXTY YEARS AGO OBSERVER’S PAGE TRANSIT OF MERCURY, INSTRUCTIONS FOR OBSERVERS PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: The Milky Way in the cepheus-Lacerta region, rich in starss and dar’k patches. Photo by frank E. Ross, Flagstaff, Ariz., October 18, 1930, using 5-inch lens of 35-inch focal length, exposure 3h. Instrument designed by Ross, constructed of Fecker, now the properly of MT. Wilson. Coordinates of center of original picture, R. A. 22 h. 12 m., Dec 50° 9’ (1855). The picture appears (1934) OCTOBER, 1940 V. IV N° 12 CONTENTS COVER: The constellations visible from 40° north at 9 oclock, October 15th. The brightnesses indicated by the symbols on the chart area apparent visual magnitudes corrected for atmospheric absorption, according to each star’s altitude at the time. From Barton and Barton Guide to the Constellations, Whittlesey House, new York STARS OF THE SOUTHERN SKY William H. Barton, Jr. THE ASTRONOMER DETECTIVE Samuel C. Silver THE STORY OF LEWIS SWIFT Ralph Bates RINGS IN THE SKY Vladimir Vand SPEAKING OF ECLIPSES Sidney Scheuer THE DOUBLE STAR INTERFEROMETER Raymond H. Wilson, Jr. DO YOU KNOW? L.J. Lafleur AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood OBSERVER’S PAGE THOSE SOUTHERN STARS GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s THE USABLE FIELD OF THE SCHMIDT Earle B. Brown NEWS NOTES Robert R. Coles PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: in the Milly way in Cygnus is the larger network nebula, N.G.C. 6992. This photograph was made on July 2, 3 and 4. 1910. With the 60-inch reflector at MT. Wilson, exposure 10h 15m. MT. Wilson photo. Courtesy revelation NOVEMBER, 1940 V. V N° I CONTENTS COVER: The constellations visible from 40° north at 9 o’clock, November 15th. The brightnesses indicated by the symbols on the chart area apparent visual magnitudes corrected for atmospheric absorption, according to each star’s altitude at the time. From Barton and Barton Guide to the Constellations, Whittlesey House, new York. TOTALITY SIGHT-SEEING AT PALOMAR Leland S. Copeland PANNEKOEK ELECTED TO A.A.S. AMERICAN ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY HOLDS 64TH MEETING Armand N. Spitz THE OLDES KNOWN NAUTICAL ALMANAC Heber D. Curtis DO YOU KNOW? L.J. Lafleur VARIABLE STARS William L. Holt TO THE POLES William h. Barton, Jr. AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS REPORT OBSERVER’S PAGE MERCURY TRANSITS ON NOVEMBER 11th THE AURORA OF SEPTENBER 26TH ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES CUNNINGHAM’S COMET TO BE BRIGHT BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s USES OF THE SCHMIDT CAMERA BY ROY A. SEELY Earle B. Brown PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: The Andromeda nebula, nearest spiral to the earth, is a particulary interesting object, because it can beseen with the naked eye. Viewed without optical aid, it is a hazy, elongated patch, near the great square of Pegasus, nearly overhead early on November evenings. Photographed in a large telescope, the nebula is revealed to be composed of millions of stars, and three small satellite galaxies. Photo by ritcheywith the 24-inch reflector, Yerkes Observatory, courtesy Revelation. DECEMBER, 1940 V. V N° 2 CONTENTS COVER: The constellations visible from 40° north at 9 o’clock, December 15th. The brightnesses indicated by the symbols on the chart area apparent visual magnitudes corrected for atmospheric absorption, according to each star’s altitude at the time. From Barton and Barton Guide to the Constellations, Whittlesey House, new York ENERGY PRODUCTION IN THE SUN Hans A. Bethe THE WISE MENS STAR William H. Barton, Jr. ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES HIEROGLYPHS IN THE SKY Ruth C. Nash DO YOU KNOW? L.J. Lafleur A.A.V.S.O. MEETS David W. Rosebrugh THE AMATEUR PLANETARIUM Sylvan Harris AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS OBSERVER’S PAGE OBSERVATION OF THE AURORA C.W.Gartlein THE COMET GROWS BRIGHTER AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood NEWS NOTES Robert r. Coles GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s A NEW ASTRONOMICAL CAMERA Earle B. Brown PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: The horsehead nebula in orion. I.C. 434 south of zeta orionis is invisible in any amateur´s telescope. It is one of the most notable dark nebulae in the sky. The MT. Wilson photo required a 3-hour exposure; Taken November 13, 1920, with the 100-inch telescope. Courtesy revelation JANUARY, 1941 V. V N° 3 CONTENTS COVER: Miss Annie J. Cannon, of Harvard observatory, photographed in 1925, in cap and grow at the time of receiving the honorary degree of Doctor of Science from Oxford University, England THE CANDELABRUM Margaret Walton Mayall THE ENCOUNTER THEORY FALLS Lyman Spitzer, Jr. THE ECLIPSE IN SOUTH AFRICA Three letters to the editor CAPELLA IN AURIGA William H. Barton, Jr. THE BEGINNER’S PAGE A GENERAL PICTURE – The solar system and the universe George V. Plachy THE EARTH WOBBLES Clarence A. Atwell DO YOU KNOW? L.J. Lafleur AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION BIOGRAPHY BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood NEWS NOTES Robert R. Coles GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s THE HARTMANN TEST Edited by Earle B. Brown ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE Jesse A. Fitzpatrick DESCRIPTION OF AURORAL FORMS THE STARS FOR JANUARY PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: The large magellanic cloud, photographed by prof. S. I. Bailey with the 8-inch Bache telescope, at Arequipa, peru, in 1897. Exposure 7 hours. Coordinates of center of cloud R.A. 5h 26m Decl. 69° 0’. This oblect and the small magellanic cloud near it are best seen from the southern hemisphere. They are probably satellite galaxies of the milky way. Harvard Obseratory photo. FEBRUARY, 1941 V. V N° 4 CONTENTS COVER: PROFESSOR Frank Schlesinger, director of yale Observatory. Photo by Harris & Ewing, 1937 FORTY YEARS OF PHOTOGRAPHC ASTROMETRY Dirk Brouwer SCIENTISTS DENOUNCE ASTRONOLOGY NEWS NOTES Robert R. Coles AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT DO YOU KNOW? L.J. Lafleur BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood THE BEGINNER’S PAGE MOTIONS IN THE SKY: Real and Apparent George V. Plachy GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s HOW LONG THE FIRST TELESCOPE? Earle B. Brown ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE OCCULTATIONS OF ALDEBARAN -1941 Jesse A. Fitzpatrick AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION THIRD NATIONAL CONVENTION THE STARS FOR FEBRUARY PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: a SUPERNOVA IN THE SPIRAL NEBULA ngc 4725. THE UPPER PHOTOGRAPHED WAS TAKEN BY Edwin Hubble with the 100-inch telescope on May 20, 1931. The lower picture was taken by Walter Baade with the same instrument on May 10, 1940, five days after the discover of the supernova at MT. palomar. The supernova is about 40 millon times brighter thah the sun. its position is marked by the arrow in the small picture on page 10. NGC 4725 is in the large ursa major group of exterior galaxies, at a distance of about five and one-half million light-years. MT. Wilson photos. MARCH, 1941 V. N° 5 CONTENTS COVER: Dr. John A. Miller, director of sproul observatory and professor of astronomy emeritus, examining in this study an eclipse negative taken by the Hayden planetarium Peruvian eclise expedition, of which Dr. Miller was co-leader and technical director. Photo by Charles H. Coles. QUAKER ASTRONOMER – JOHN A. MILLER John H. Pitman COMETS AND METEORS William H. Barton, Jr. AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT DO YOU KNOW? L.J. Lafleur MODERN WEATHER FORECASTING Horace R. Byers ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BOOKS AND THE SKY Marian Lockwood GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s DIAGONALS Earle B. Brown AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION NEWS NOTES Robert R. Coles THE BEGINNER’S PAGE TIME RECKONING-THE SUN AS A CLOCK George V. Plachy OBSERVER’S PAGE COMET 1941C TWO ECLIPSES IN MARCH Jesse A. Fitzpatrick THE STARS FOR MARCH HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: The great nebula in orion, M42 and 43, shows intricate structure of light and dark nebulosity. The photo is by N.U. Mayall with the 36-inch crossley reflector of the Lick Observatory, January 17, 1939, exposure 2 hours, scale of the reproduction, approximately 1 inch-7,7 minutes of arc; enlarged about 2.1 times from the original negative. MAY, 1941 V. V N° 7 CONTENTS COVER: Dr. Albert Einstein. Professor of mathematics and theoretical physics at the institute for advanced study, Princeton N.J. photo by Clyde Fisher, june 11, 1938 20th CENTURY CO-ORDINATOR – H. Gordon Garbedian PHOTOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENTS OF DOUBLE STARS – K. Aa Strand A.A.V.S.O. MEETING AT VASSAR DIVINNING ROD FOR PORTABLES – Earl C. Witherspoon MATA-RIKI AND MEAMEI BELOW THE CELESTIAL EQUATOR – William H. Barton, Jr. AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES SCIENTISTS DENOUNCE ASTRONOLOGY THE BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOKS AND THE SKY DO YOU KNOW? GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE THE STARS FOR MAY PLANETARIUM NOTES BACK COVER: Region of Eta carinae in the southern sky, photographed in red light. The star wich gives this nebula its name is 6 ¾ inches diagonally from the lower left corner. See page 12 for details. Photo by Harvard’s Southern station with the 60-inch reflector. JUNE, 1941 V. V N° 8 CONTENTS COVER: Dr. Otto Struve, director of Yerkes and Mcdonald Observatories, at the comparator Used for measuring stellar spectrograms. Photographed by W. W. Morgan YERKES OBSERVATORY (1897-1941) – W. W. Morgan COLOR IN THE SKY - William H. Barton, Jr THE TRIPLE UNIVERSE IN ANDROMEDA – Leland S. Copeland WHAT MAKES RAINBOWS? – Martha Goddard Morrow AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES THE BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOKS AND THE SKY DO YOU KNOW? GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES THE STARS FOR JUNE BACK COVER: The moon, aged 22.06 days photographed October 26, 1937 at Lick observatory by Moore and Chapell using the 36-inch reflector with full aperture, exposure 0.75 seconds the seeing was at least 4 on a scale 0.5. See the Sky, April 1941, for lunar charts and photographs. JULY, 1941 V. V N° 9 CONTENTS COVER: A miniature- camera photograph of Dr. Heber D. Curtis, director of the Observatories of the Universitary of Michigan. Taken by Victor Goedicke, 1938 ARE ASTRONOMERS FOLKS – Keivin Burns THE SUN – William H. Barton, Jr. WHAT MAKES RAINBOWS? Part II – Martha Goddard Morrow THE GEOLOGIC RECORDS OF TIME – Adolph Knopf NOTES ON THE A.A.V.S.O. SPRING MEETING AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES THE BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOKS AND THE SKY DO YOU KNOW? GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES THE STARS FOR JULY BACK COVER: m8-NGC 6523, 6530. Cluster and nebula in Sagittarius, photographed with the crossley 36-inch reflector at Lick Observatory, exposure 2 hours, N.U. mayal on July AUGUST, 1941 V. V N° 10 CONTENTS COVER: v.m. Slipher and E. C. Slipher , of Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, Ariz. Photograph by Clyde fisher. THE BROTHERS SLIPHER – John C. Duncan THE GEOLOGIC RECORDS OF TIME, PART II – Adolph Knopf TRANSIT TIMES- Clifford N. Anderson SUMMER STARS - – William H. Barton, Jr. NOTES ON THE WASHIGTON MEETING – Mabel Sterns AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES THE BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOKS AND THE SKY DO YOU KNOW? GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES THE STARS FOR JULY BACK COVER: Photograph of Jupiter by E. C. Slipher, of Lowell observatory. Taken August 8, 1938, with the 24-inch reflector and yellow color filter SEPTEMBER, 1941 V. V N° 11 CONTENTS COVER: Dr. H. R. Morgan, of the U. S. Naval observatory, at the 9-inch transit crcle. This instrument has been in continuous use since its installation by prof. Simon Newcomb in 1865. It is in the east end of the clock house at the naval observatory THE NATION’S OBSERVATORY – Isabel M. lewis AN ACCURATE SUN AND STAR CLOCK – Frederick K. Vreeland COMMON ERRORS IN METEORIC ASTRONOMY – C. C. Wylie CELESTIAL TRAVELOGUE – William H. Barton, Jr. DO WE OWE OUR MUSICIANS AND ARTISTIC TO THE STARS? – Paul R. Farnsworth AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES THE BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOKS AND THE SKY DO YOU KNOW? GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES THE STARS FOR SEPTEMBER BACK COVER: The sun, on July 28, 1941, photographed by Mrs. L. T. Day, with the 5-inch photoheliograph at the u.s. Naval observatory. It is reproduced as it appears in the sky. Preliminary measures for the large group indicate 76 condensation covering 1.309 millionths of the visible hemisphere –about 27 square degrees. OCTUBER, 1941 V. V N° 12 CONTENTS COVER: A team of astronomers known the world over, Henry Norris Russell (standing) and the late Raymond s. Dungan. Photograph by Dorothy N. Davis, April 1, 1938 PRINCETON UNIVERSITY OBSERVATORY – Charlotte E. Moore MYSTERIOUS MARS – William H. Barton, Jr. COMMON ERRORS IN METEORIC ASTRONOMY – C. C. Wylie AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT AURORA COMES SOUTH A. A. S. MEETING – Mary R. Calvert AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES THE BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOKS AND THE SKY DO YOU KNOW? GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES THE STARS FOR OCTOBER BACK COVER: Mars, August 9, 1939. Photographed with the 27-inch reflactor of the Lamont Hussey Observatory, Bloemfontein, South Africa, made by E. C. Slipher, of Lowell Observatory, with a yellow filter, on an Eastman spectroscopic plate. At the distance of distinct vision (10 inches ) this enlargement shows the planet as it would appear in a telescope magnifying about 4,500 times NOVEMBER, 1941 V. I N° 1 CONTENTS COVER: The aurora of September 18th, 7:50 pm. E. S. T. Looking southwest, taken at patchoque L.I. by E. Dayton Thorne. See the picture by Fred Schmid on page 15 for the eastern end of this same band LEONIDS AT LAVORIKA – John A. Kingsbury BIOGRAPHY – The telescope – The sky MYSTERIOUS MARS – William H. Barton, Jr. FRIENDS OF MINE 30TH ANNUAL MEETING – A.A.V.S.O. – Percy W. Witherell HOW DISTANT IS THE SUN? J.S. PLASKETT NEWS FROM ABROAD AURORAL BURST SUPREME DESCRIPTION OF AURORAL FORMS PROPOSED BY- LAWS OF A.A.L.A. AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES THE BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOKS AND THE SKY DO YOU KNOW? GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES THE STARS FOR NOVEMBER BACK COVER: The full moon, photographed with the crossley 36-inch reflector at lick observatory. An article on the moon appears on page 17. DECEMBER, 1941 V. I N° 2 CONTENTS COVER: The administration building of the observatory at tonanzintla under construction. The library and lecture room is to the right; the staff offices and workishop are at the left photo by Bart J. Bok MEXICO’S NEW NATIONAL OBSERVATORY – Bart J. Bok SUN GAZERS ON TUTUJAN HILL – Foster D. brunton THE FORGOTTEN PLANETS –Harry Stubbs CHRISTMAS STORY - William H. Barton, Jr. VENUS AS THE CHRISTMAS STAR – Jesse A. Fitzpatrick HARLOW SHAPLEY HONORED PROGRESS IN EXTRAGALACTIC RESEARCH – Katherine Gordon AN OBSERVATION OF THE SOLAR CORONA AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES THE BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOKS AND THE SKY DO YOU KNOW? GLEANINGS FOR A.T. M.s HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES THE STARS FOR DECEMBER BACK COVER: Stephan’s quintet in Pegasus, N.G.C 7317-20. A close group of four spiral nebulae and one spheroidal systems, exposure 7h 45 m August 26, 27, 1916 with the 60-inch MT. Wilsson reflector. The spiral at left center is really double – two nuclei may be seen. Originally discovered by John Herschel, the group was described in 1877 by M. E. Stephan , of Marseilles as being excessively excessively feeble- excessively smll – very difficult to observe.

Número Ingreso Código Base de Datos Ubicación Tipo # Ej. Status Devolución Reserva
1051152HR 520 FEB-DIC 1940 - ENE-MAR/MAY-DIC 1941 ST  Colección Mario Sotillo UCSP - Sucre Original 1Disponible  

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