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Código:HR 520 ENE-DIC 1943 ST [Colección Mario Sotillo]
Ubicación:UCSP - Sucre
Autor Personal:Sky Publishing Corporation
TítuloSky and telescope
Ciudad: Boston
Editorial: Sky Publishing Corporation
Año: 1943
Descripción:Varias páginas; il. 29 cm.
Notas:F.I. 20/10/2016
Palabras Claves:ASTRONOMÍA;
;
Términos Locales:Astronomìa - Revista;
Encabezados Geográficos:

Código:HR 520 ENE-DIC 1943 ST [Colección Mario Sotillo]
100:Sky Publishing Corporation
245Sky and telescope
260:Boston: Sky Publishing Corporation: 1943:
300:Varias páginas; il. 29 cm.
500:F.I. 20/10/2016
650:ASTRONOMÍA;
653Astronomìa - Revista

Sky Publishing Corporation. Sky and telescope. -- . --Boston: Sky Publishing Corporation: 1943. # Ingreso:1051337

   Varias páginas; il..29 cm..

JANUARY 1943 V. II N° 3 CONTENTS Cover: Sir Isaac Newton a portrait reproduced from the mezzotint of macArdel. This mezzotint was based on a painting by E. seeman, described as “one of the most refined and interesting extrant.” Courtesy of Isis. ISAAC NEWTON (1643-1727) – i. Bernard Cohen OBSERVING NOVA PUPPIS – Dean B. Mclaughlin THE USE OF THE NAUTICAL ALMANAC IN RACTICAL NAVIGATION Fred L. Whipple STARS OF A WINTER NIGHT – William H. Barton, Jr. GRAPHIC TIME TABLE OF THE HEAVENS – 1943 SOLAR ECLIPSE IN ALASKA – Leo Mattersdof AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOK AND THE SKY NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES THE STARRY HEAVEN’S IN JANUARY BACK COVER: M81 n.g.c. 3031, AN INTERMEDIATE TYPE SPIRAL IN URSA MAJOR, PHOTOGRAPHED WITH THE 60-INCH REFLECTOR AT MR Wilson, exposure, 4th 15th. The galaxy, which has a very bright central portion, is about 16’ by 10’ with a photographic magnitude of 8.9 its 1950 position is 9th 51.5m. 69° 18’. FEBRUARY 1943 V. II N° 4 CONTENTS Cover: Ambrose swasey (1846-1937), co-founder wich W. R. Warner of the warner and swasey company, Cleveland, Ohio. Photo by Harry & Ewing AMBROSE SWASEY – Telescope Engineer – Ralph S. bates THE 69TH MEETING OF THE .A.S. – Oliver J. Lee COMPUTING THE POSITION – H. O. 208 and 211 OUR PLANETARY NEIGHBORS – William H. Barton, Jr COLOR IN LUNAR ECLIPSES – Martha Goddard Morrow THE MOON AS A SOURCE OF TEKTITES – h. h. Nininger AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOK AND THE SKY GLEANINGS FOR A.T.M.s LIST OF DOUBLE STARS – 4TH TO 8TH NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES SAUCE FOR THE GANDER THE STARRY HEAVEN’S IN FEBRUARY BACK COVER: The great nebula in Andromeda, M33. And its companions, M32 (lover center) and N.G.C. 205 (upper right), photographed with the crossley 36-inch reflector (focal length, 209 inches) at lick observatory by Nicholas U. Mayall. The exposure time was 41/2 hours, on November 7, 1937. The center of the nebula was locally reduced to bring out the intricate spiral structure, at the same time preserving the faint outer portions of the spiral. The enlargement is about 1.8 times the original negative, on wich the scale is about 37 seconds of are per millimeter. MARCH 1943 V. II N° 5 CONTENTS Cover: Whipple’s comet, contact reproduction of a 75-minute exposure with the 16-inch Metcalf refractor at Harvard’s Oak Ridge station, February 2-3, 1943, by Henry Sawyer. OUR NEAREST COSMIC NEIGHBORS – Asmstrong Thomas MARCH WEATHER – Charles F. Brooks AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT THE MOON AS A SOURCE OF TEKTITES, II –H. H. Nininger PLOTTING THE POSITION – Francis J. Heyden, S. J. A MODEL PLANETARIUM – V. C. Jones STARS IN SONG AND STORY –William H. Barton, Jr. AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOK AND THE SKY Gleanings for A.T.M.s HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES SAUCE FOR THE GANDER THE STARRY HEAVEN’S IN MARCH BACK COVER: One of the well-known series of lick observatory photographs is of the full moon, taken by N.U. Mayall with the crossley reflector. APRIL 1943 V. II N° 6 CONTENTS Cover: The versatility of the star projector at the University of Nebraska (article on page 6) is illustrated by the many types of spherical surfaces it can reproduce on the screen pictured on the front cover are its unusual slides (clockwise from left): constellations and boundaries; constellations (great square) and Milky Way; constellations (southern cross and corvus) and Milky way; lunar features: sunspots; and the earth. THE 1769 TRANSIT OF VENUS AND ITS RELATION To early American astronomy – Albert E. lowness A NOVEL PROJECTION DEVICE – Oliver C.Collins MORE ABOUT NOVA PUPPIS – Leon Campbell ANOTHER GOOD ECLIPSE AN ENGLISHMAN RENAMES THE STARS A GRAPHICAL DETERNATION OF PI – Carl A. Hellmann WEATHER SIGNS IN THE SKY – William H. Barton, Jr. Air and Sea and sky AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOK AND THE SKY Gleanings for A.T.M.s LIST OF DOUBLE STARS – 8h to 12h NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE SAUCE FOR THE GARDEN BACK COVER: The whirlpool nebula in Canes Venatici, M51 (N.G.C.5194) and its peculiar companion N.G.C. 5195, wich appears as an attachment to one fo the spiral arms, this was the the first nebula to be distinguished as spiral; it has an apparent diameter of about 6’ and an apparent magnitudes of 11.1. this photograph is a three-hour exposure with the 100-inch telescope at mt. Wilson, may 15, 1926. MAY 1943 V. II N° 7 CONTENTS Cover: Nicholas Copernicus, from a painting by Arthur Szyk. Courtesy, the Kosciuszko foundation. NICHOLAS COPERNICUS – The Man and His Work THE CASE OF THE WILLAMETTE – J. Hugh Pruett A TRIBUTE TO COPERNICUS – Muad w. makemson Air and Sea and sky AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOK AND THE SKY Gleanings for A.T.M.s NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE SAUCE FOR THE GARDEN THE STARs FOR MAY BACK COVER: Two pieces of the wilamette (from the collection of Mr. and Mrs. J. Hugh Pruett) which were taken from different parts of the meteorite, show different types of etching. JUNE 1943 V. II N° 8 CONTENTS Cover: The 72-inch reflector of tnhe dominion astrophysical observatory at Victoria, british Columbia, Canada, with the late Dr. J.S. Plaskett, first director of the observatory, standing by the telescope controls. Dr. Plaskett was largely responsible for the design and construction of the instrument. The spectrograph is attached at the lower end of the tube. See page 8 for an article describing the recent alumininzing of the large mirror. IN THE MYSTERIOUS LAND OF RV TAURI STARS – Sergei Gaposchkin SUN WORSHIP – PAST AND PRESENT – William H. Barton, Jr. ALUMINIZING THE 72-INCH MIRROR AT VICTORIA – Andrew mckellar PRONOUNCING ASTRONOMICAL NAMES HOW TO PREDICT OCCULTATIONS – Jesse A. Fitzpatrick Air and Sea and sky AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOK AND THE SKY Gleanings for A.T.M.s NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE SAUCE FOR THE GANDER THE STARS FOR JUNE BACK COVER: Afield full of galaxies –the corona Borealis cluster – centered on R.A. 15h 19.3m, dec. + 27° 56’ (north at the top); scale, about 83 second per inch on the reproduction. Photographed by Edwin P. Hubble on June 20, 1933, with the 100-inch reflector at mt. Wilson Observatory. See “in Focus” on page 20 for further details. JULY 1943 V. II N° 9 CONTENTS Cover: The moon, Venus and Jupiter in the western sky 6, 1943. Photo by Peter A. Leavens, Oceanside, long island ASTRONOMERS MEET AT CAMBRIDGE – Margaret Walton mayall THE OBSOLETE TROPIC OF CANCER PROBLEMS OF STELLAR EVOLUTION – Cecilia Payne Gaposchkin SUMMER STARS – William H. Barton, Jr. AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT Air and Sea and sky AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOK AND THE SKY Gleanings for A.T.M.s HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES SAUCE FOR THE GANDER THE STARS FOR JULY BACK COVER: The globular cluster M13 in Hercules, photographed with the mt. Wilson 60-inch telescope, with an 11-hour total exposure on three nights. Its position is 16h 39,9m + 36° 33’. M13 is one of the few globular clusters visible to the naked eye, and a long exposure such as this reveals thousands of its estimated 100,000 stelar members. AUGUST 1943 V. II N° 10 CONTENTS Cover: An amateur-made contemporary sundial, constructed by Earl C. Witherspoon, sunter, S. C. KNOW YOUR SUNDIALS – R.newton Mayall A REMARKABLE LIBRARY – Keivin Burns SOLILOQUY OF A VARIABLE STAR OBSERVER – Cyrus f. Fernald THE ANSWER’S IN THE SKY – William H. Barton, Jr. Air and Sea and sky AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOK AND THE SKY Gleanings for A.T.M.s NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES SAUCE FOR THE GANDER THE STARS FOR AUGUST BACK COVER: The trifid nebula, M20, in Sagittarius, is a striking example of a diffuse nebula, with bright and dark formations. Photographed with the 60-inch reflector, and an exposure of 2h 26m, at Mt. Wilson Observatory. Located very near the positionof the winter solstice, M20 is also close to the larger lagoon nebula (M8), hey lie ina region containing a great deal of obscuring matter, wich may indicate that they are but illuminated parts of an extensive nebulous region. Mr Wilson Observatory photo SEPTEMBER 1943 V. II N° 11 CONTENTS Cover: Prince Henry of Portugal, called the navigator, after a print a print by Simon de passe. ELEMENTS IN THE SUN – Charltte E. moore SALUTING AN ASTRONOMER – Joseph R. habes, S.J. NAUTICAL NOTES – William H. Barton, Jr. COLLECTIONS OF SUNDIALS IN THE UNITED STATES – R. Newton Mayall Air and Sea and sky AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOK AND THE SKY Gleanings for A.T.M.s IN FOCUS NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES SAUCE FOR THE GANDER THE STARS FOR SEPTEMBER BACK COVER: The region of the Milky Way surrounding Antares and the head of the scorpion, photographed by frank E. Ross at Lowell observatory, Flagstaff, Ariz, May 19, 1931. The exposure time was three hours, using a Ross-Fecker lens of 5-inch aperture, 35-inch focus, now the property of Mount Wilson Observatory. The print from which this engraving is slightly enlarged is plate 2 of the “Atlas of the Northern milky way” by Frank E. rosss and Mary R. Calvert, published by the University of Chicago press, 1934 OCTOBER 1943 V. II N° 12 CONTENTS Cover: The Small magellanic cloud, from a photograph taken at Harvard’s Southern Hemisphere station, witn the brightest globular cluster, 47 Tucanae, included in the field. The cloud is at a distance of about 84,000 light-year, and the diameter of its main portions is about 5,500 light-year. All of the stars in the photograph, except those between us and the cloud, are considerably brihter thah the sun. 47 Tucanae is such a large globular cluster, of total absolute magnitude about – 11 that it may be considered a small galaxy in its own right. To the left of the Small cloud is another globular cluster, N.G.C. 362 THE STORY OF VV CEPHEI – Victor Goedicke AN IMPROVED PLANISPHERE – Oliver C. Collins THE SOUTHERN SKY – William H. Barton, Jr. The total solar eclipse of January 25, 1944 – Charles H. Smiley AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOK AND THE SKY Gleanings for A.T.M.s NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES SAUCE FOR THE GANDER THE STARS FOR OCTOBER BACK COVER: The large Magellanic cloud, which together with the small cloud, is considered by many to be a detached part of the Milky Way galaxy. It is some 75,000 light-year away, and the diameter of its main body is 10,000 light-year. This photograph was taken by S.I. bailey with the 8-inch Bache telescope at Arequipa, Perú, in 1897, exposure, 7 hour. The magellanic clouds are within 25 degrees of the south celestial pole, so may be seen only from the Torrid Zone and the Southern Hemisphere. NOVEMBER 1943 V. III N° 1 CONTENTS Cover: The Zeiss projection planetarium as it appears today, 10 year after its installation in the fels planetarium of the franklin Institute, Philadelphia, Pa The shadow is produced by special lighting and shows some details of the instrument not visible directly in ythis photograph. Some buildings of Philadelphia are represented by the horizon silhouette. The projection instruments of four other American planetariums are identical with this one. Fels planetarium photograph. THE PLANETARIUM – Roy K. Marshall FACTS COLLECTED FOR A TRIP TO THE MOON – William H. Barton, Jr. VARIABLE STAR OBSERVERS MEET – Eleanor C. Polk HOW FIREBALLS SHOULD BE OBSERVED – Charles P. Oliver LUNAR CRATER THEORIES – J. Foster Foster AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOK AND THE SKY Gleanings for A.T.M.s NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES THE STARS FOR NOVEMBER BACK COVER: Theb great bolide of August 13, 1923, photographed by M. de Kerolyr at the Astrophysical station at haute-provence, France. The region is that of Cygnus with Dened near the right-center edge of the picture and the North American nebula between it and the meteor. Note the varitions in brightnesss of the meteor, as well as corresponding changes in the amount of halation, which produced the wide “ghost” on each side of the fireball’s image. The engraving was made from an original print in the possession of Dr. Charles P. Oliver DECEMBER 1943 V. III N° 2 CONTENTS Cover: The Cincinnati observatory, wich celebrates its centennial this year. At the left is the main building. Built in 1873, and housing the 16-inch refractor, wich was installed in 1904. In front of the the main building is the latitude variation building, which dates this picture as proably between 1913 and 1920. At the right is the Michael building, housing the original 12-inch refractor. ONE HUNDRED YEARS AT THE CINCINNATI OBSERVATORY – Everett I, Yowell THE WISE MEN’S STAR – Marian Lockwood AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS MEET – Loraze B. Taylor and frank k. Edmondson THE PLANETARIUM – II – Roy K. Marshall AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASTRONOMICAL ANECDOTES BEGINNER’S PAGE BOOK AND THE SKY Gleanings for A.T.M.s IN FOCUS NEWS NOTES OBSERVER’S PAGE PLANETARIUM NOTES SAUCE FOR THE GANDER STARS FOR DECEMBER BACK COVER: The southern part of the moon around Tycho and Clavius, photographed on October 26, 1937, by J.H. Moore and J.F. Chappelll, using the visual focus of the 36-inch refractor at Lick observatory. This is a reduction of part of plate 12 of the Lick observatory atlas of celestial photographs. The age of the moon was 22.06 days; the exposure 0.75 second, at full aperture. A wedge –shaped focal-plane shutter increases the exposure logarithmically from the limb to the terminator, thereby compensating for the decrease in the intensy of the illumination. Tycho is the large crater 2 ½ inches from the right side and 5 ½ inclus from the top of picture.

Número Ingreso Código Base de Datos Ubicación Tipo # Ej. Status Devolución Reserva
1051337HR 520 ENE-DIC 1943 ST  Colección Mario Sotillo UCSP - Sucre Original 1Disponible  

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