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Código:HR 520 ENE-MAY/JUL-NOV 1956 - ENE-AGO/OCT-DIC 1957 ST [Colección Mario Sotillo]
Ubicación:UCSP - Sucre
Autor Personal:Sky Publishing Corporation
TítuloSky and telescope
Ciudad: Cambridge, Mass.
Editorial: Sky Publishing Corporation
Año: 1957
Descripción:páginas; 107-154 il., fots. 29 cm.
Notas:F.I. 20/10/2016
Palabras Claves:ASTRONOMÍA;
;
Términos Locales:Astronomía - Revista;
Idioma: Inglés;
Encabezados Geográficos:

Código:HR 520 ENE-MAY/JUL-NOV 1956 - ENE-AGO/OCT-DIC 1957 ST [Colección Mario Sotillo]
100:Sky Publishing Corporation
245Sky and telescope
260:Cambridge, Mass.: Sky Publishing Corporation: 1957:
300:páginas; 107-154 il., fots. 29 cm.
500:F.I. 20/10/2016
650:ASTRONOMÍA;
653Astronomía - Revista; Idioma: Inglés

Sky Publishing Corporation. Sky and telescope. -- . --Cambridge, Mass.: Sky Publishing Corporation: 1957. # Ingreso:1051341

   páginas; 107-154 il., fots..29 cm..

JANUARY 1956 V. 15 Nº 3 COVER: Armagh Observatory, at Armagh, North Ireland, as seen from the south. The domes in the foreground house a 10-inch refractor (left) and a new 12-inch Schmidt telescope (right). The latter has been used to study variable stars and comets. The square structure just beyond the wooden gate houses E. J. Opik´s and observatory office, surmounted by a dome containing a 3-inch refractor that was part of the original equipment of the observatory. Photograph by H. Allison and Son, Armagh. - A NEW AMERICAN OBSERVATORY - THE ORIGIN OF THE MOON´S SURFACE FEATURES – I – Harold C. Urey - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - INTERSTELLAR MATTER - Otto Struve - FOURTHER NOTES FROM THE IAU MEETING - GRAPHIC TIME TABLE OF THE HEAVENS – 1956 – Maryland Academy of Sciences - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS - BOOKS AND THE SKY William Herschel The Golden Book of Astronomy Our Moon - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s Notes on Basic Optics – XVII A Scale for Measuring Paraboloidal Correction - NEWS NOTES – Dorrit Hoffleit - OBSERVER´S PAGE Astrophotography for the Amateur – I - SKY AND TEACHER The First Course in Astronomy FEATURE PICTURE: A removable finding map of the moon, identifying some 350 of its craters and other features conspicuous in small telescopes. As with all lunar charts, south is above and west to the left; the view matches that in an astronomical or inverting telescope. The basic map is reduced to about half size from Karel Andel´s Mappa Selenographica, first published at Prague, Czechoslovakia, by Joseph Klepesta, in 1926. --- FEBRUARY 1956 V. 15 Nº 4 COVER: An enlargement from one 35-mm. frame of series photographs of the sun´s limb, obtained by Richard B. Dunn with a special camera built by him at the Upper Air Research Observatory, Sunspot, N. M. The telescope has a 15-inch nonachromatic lens of 956 inches focal length, and it used with a system of beam splitters and filters to show simultaneously details in the light of the solar continuum and the hydrogen-lpha line, as indicated by the key chart on page 152. Upper Air Research Observatory photograph. - ASTRONAVIGATION IN THE AIR - PROBLEMS OF THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE - THE ANNULAR ECLIPSE OF DECEMBER 14TH - THE ORIGIN OF THE MOON´S SURFACE FEATURES – II – Harold C. Urey - A NEW SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE OBSERVATORY - OLD AND YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS – Otto Struve - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS - ASTRONOMICAL SCRAPBOOK The Case of the Lost Trans-Neptunian Planet - BOOKS AND THE SKY Radio Astronomy Solar Energy Research - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s A Grinding Machine and Some Telescopes A portable 12-inch Tube Ventilation by Suction Twin Telescopes in Seattle - IN FOCUS - NEWS NOTES – Dorrit Hoffleit - OBSERVER´S PAGE Astrophotography for the Amateur – II Deep-Sky Wonders - SOUTHERN STARS - STARS FOR FEBRUARY FEATURE PICTURE: The southern portion of the moon as a waxing crescent, 4.6 days old, from a photograph made with the Lick 36-inch refractor on June 2, 1938, by J. H. Moore and J. F. Chappell. Lick Observatory photograph. --- MARCH 1956 V. 15 Nº 5 COVER: These twin telescopes are 12 1/2-inch Newtonian reflectors built by Clarke Harris, Torrance, Calif., with the optical parts made by Thomas R. Cave, Jr., Long Beach, Calif. The telescopes can be used either as altazimuths or as motor-driven equatorials. - PLANS FOR A LARGE RADIO TELESCOPE - SOME LUNAR CRATER PROBLEMS – Patrick Moore - AMATEURS TO OBSERVE SATELLITES - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - WOLF-RAYET STARS – Otto Struve - A TRIBUTE TO ROBERT FROST – Percy M. Proctor - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS The North Canton Planetarium in Ohio - BOOKS AND THE SKY The History of the Telescope Frontiers of Astronomy - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s Notes on Basic Optics – XVIII Twin 12 1/2-inch Short-focus Newtonian Reflectors - HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS - NEWS NOTES – Dorrit Hoffleit - OBSERVER´S PAGE Astrophotography for the Amateur – III Venus and the Moon in Conjunction Deep-Sky Wonders - SKY AND TEACHER A Workshop in the Teaching of Astronomy - I - STARS FOR MARCH FEATURE PICTURE: The southwestern portion of the moon as a waxing crescent, 4.6 days old, from a photograph made with the Lick 36-inch refractor on June 2, 1938, by J. H. Moore and J. F. Chappell, Lick Observatory photograph. --- APRIL 1956 V. 15 Nº 6 COVER: A scene at the convention of junior astronomers held at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago on January 15, 1956. Fourteen-year-old Larry Ewing, of the paper he and Keith Cleveland (fifth from the left) gave on the carbón cycle and proton-proton reaction in the generation of solar energy. Chicago Tribune photograph. - MORE SATELLITE NOTES - ILLUSIONS THAT TRAP LUNAR OBSERVERS – Leland S. Copeland - RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE RED SHIFT OF GALAXIES - ALPHA HERCULIS – Otto Struve - A GRAPHIC TIME TABLE OF MARS - IRIS PHOTOMETRY OF STELLAR PHOTOGRAPHS – James Cuffey - THE AHNIGHITO WEIGHS IN - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS Junior Convention Held in Chicago Miami Convention Notes - ASTRONOMICAL SCRAPBOOK Mars at Its Nearest - BOOKS AND THE SKY The Moon Periodicity and Variation of Solar (and Lunar) Eclipses Estudies of Long Period Variables - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s The Youngstown Astronomy Club 16-inch Cassegrainian Controlling an Electric Drive at the Clock - NEWS NOTES – Dorrit Hoffleit - OBSERVER´S PAGE Astrophotography for the Amateur – IV Jupiter Passing Regulus - SOUTHERN STARS - STARS FOR APRIL FEATURE PICTURE: The northwestern portion of the moon as a waxing crescent, 4,6 days old, from a photograph made with the Lick 36-inch refractor on June 2, 1938, by J. H. Moore and J. F. Chappell Lick Observatory photograph. --- MAY 1956 V. 15 Nº 7 COVER: A view from the rim of the Barringer meteorite cráter, situated between Winslow and Flagstaff, Ariz., south of U.S. 66. At. Left center, near the middle of the floor of the crater, are the ruined buildings from the mining operatins once carried on in a search for meteoritic iron Deep in the earth. From the present floor to its rim, the cráter is nearly 600 feet high. - SOLAR ACTIVITY IN FEBRUARY - METEORITES – AND THEIR EFFECTS – Otto Struve - THE HOLLEFORD CRATER IN ONTARIO - VISUAL PROBLEMS OF MARS – William D. Carragan - THE SIBERIAN METEORITE FALL OF FEBRUARY, 1947 – E. Krinov - HERSCHEL´S “LUNAR VOLCANOS” - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - AMERICAN ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY GROUP PHOTOGRAPH - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS Fourther News About the Miami Convention “Astronomy Special” to Miami Convention - BOOKS AND THE SKY Vistas in Astronomy – Volume I Amateur Telescope Making – Book One - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s Notes on Basic Optics – XIX Inexpensives Setting Circles and Slow Motions - NEWS NOTES – Dorrit Hoffeit - OBSERVER´S PAGE February Sunspots and a Red Aurora Deep-Sky Wonders - PLANETARIUM NOTES - SKY AND TEACHER A Workshop in the Teaching of Astronomy - II - STARS FOR MAY FEATURE PICTURE: The northern portion of the moon a waxing crescent, 4.6 days old, from a photograph made with the Lick 36-inch refractor on June 2, 1938, by J. H. Moore and J. F. Chappell. Lick Observatory photograph. --- JULY 1956 V. 15 Nº 9 COVER: The new 60-foot radio telescope of Harvard Observatory, now in operation at the George R. Agassiz station near Harvard, Mass. Photograph by Robert E. Cox. - SOUTHERN DOUBLE STARS - HARVARD´S NEW RADIO TELESCOPE – David S. Heeschen - ELEMENT FORMATION IN STARS – I – Otto Struve - HARRISONBURG OBSERVATORY EXPANDS FACILITIES - THE DUSKY MARKING OF VENUS - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - A MASTER OF STELLAR SPECTRA – Harlow Shapley - BULLETIN FOR VISUAL OBSERVERS OF SATELLITES – Nº 1 - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS Western Amateur Astronomers to Meet in Flagstaff - BOOKS AND THE SKY The Sun and Its Influence A Popular Guide to the Heavens Maria Mitchell, Girl Astronomer Ionized Gases A Mariner´s Meteorology - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s A Closed Tube, Low-Diffaction, Portable Reflector - II - NEWS NOTES – Dorrit Hoffeit - OBSERVER´S PAGE Deep-Sky Wonders - SKY AND TEACHER A Teaching Unit in Astronomy – Grade 6 - SOUTHERN STARS - STARS FOR JULY FEATURE PICTURE: The southeastern portion of the moon as a waring crescent, 24.3 days old, from a photograph made with the Lick 36-inch refractor on August 20, 1938, by J. H. Moore and J. F. Chappell. Lick Observatory photograph. --- AUGUST 1956 V. 15 Nº 10 COVER: In this turret at Sacramento Peak Observatory, two of the wold´s most effective telescopes for solar research opérate under the transparent skies of New Mexico. They are a 16-inch coronagraph and a 15-inch chromospheric telescope, both mounted on the same 26-foot-long spar. The room covered by the turret is 50 feet in diameter; the view here is from the south. Wings to the east contain laboratories. Sacramento Peak Observatory-Air Force photograph. - VENUS AS A RADIO SOURCE - THE SACRAMENTO PEAK OBSERVATORY – John W. Evans - JAPANESE OBSERVATIONS OF A MAJOR CHANGE ON MARS – Tsuneo Saheki - A COMPLEX PERSEID METEOR SPECTRUM – Peter M. Millman - ELEMENT FORMATION IN STARS – II – Otto Struve - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS - ASTRONOMICAL SCRAPBOOK Surveying the Moon - BOOKS AND THE SKY Temperature, Its Measurement and Control in Science and Industry – Volume II Electronics - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s Notes on Basic Optics - XX - NEWS NOTES – Dorrit Hoffleit - OBSERVER´S PAGE A Travel Guide for Amateur Observers of Mars - PLANETARIUM NOTES - STARS FOR AUGUST FEATURE PICTURE: The northeastern portion of the moon as a waning crescent, 24.3 days old, from a photograph made with the Lick 36-inch refractor on August 20, 1938 by J. H. Moore and J. F. Chappell. Lick Observatory photograph. --- SEPTEMBER 1956 V. 15 Nº 11 COVER: The exhibit of the Fort Lauderdale Astronomical Association at the convention of the Astronomical League, held in Miami, Fla., July 1-4, 1956. This is a black-and-white reproduction from a Kodachrome transparency by Russell C. Maag. - SOME TECHNICAL JOURNALS - PENNSYLVANIA SYMPOSIUM – “NEW HORIZONS IN ASTRONOMY” - NOTES ON A CONVENTION IN MIAMI - THE SPECTRA OF COMETS – Otto Struve - SWIFT´S FORECAST OF MARS´ SATELLITES – Henry C. Brinton - ASAPH HALL AND THE MOONS OF MARS – John T. Kane - ALPO MAP OF MARS - AMATEUR ASTRONOMER - BOOKS AND THE SKY Amateur Astronomer´s Handbook Observational Astronomy for Amateurs Guide to Mars Recent Advances in Optics - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s Notes on Basic Optics – XXI - HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS - NEWS NOTES – Dorrit Hoffleit - OBSERVER´S PAGE The Return of Comet Olbers (1956a) Deep-Sky Wonders Photographs of Jupiter and Venus - SKY AND TEACHER A Teaching Unit in Astronomy – Grade 6 (Continued) - SOUTHERN STARS - STARS FOR SEPTEMBER FEATURE PICTURE: The northern portion of the moon as a waning crescent, 24.3 days old, from a photograph made with the Lick 36-inch refractor on August 20, 1938, by J. H. Moore and J. F. Chappell. Lick Observatory photograph. --- OCTOBER 1956 V. 15 Nº 12 COVER: On August 11 th, Governor Joseph B. Johnson of Vermont atended the annual convention of telescope makers at Springfield, Vt. He is seen here discussing satellite observing and instrumentation with Dr. James G. Baker, Harvard Observatory (left), and Dr. J. Allen Hynek, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (right). Photograph by Robert E. Cox. - NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AID TO ASTRONOMY - CONVENTION IN VERMONT - THE HYADES CLUSTER – Otto Struve - ISLANDS IN THE PATH OF THE 1958 TOTAL ECLIPSE – H. von Kluber - A METHOD FOR TIMING ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATIONS – M. Francis - THE WAXING CRESCENT MOON - BULLETIN FOR VISUAL OBSERVERS OF SATELLITES – Nº 2 - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS Observing Activities of New York Amateurs - ASTRONOMICAL SCRAPBOOK Notes on Comet Hunting - BOOKS AND THE SKY Astronomie Populaire A Gallery of Scientists The Exploration of Mars The World of Atoms - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s Figuring and Testing a Schmidt Correcting Plate A Simple Mounting for Astronomical Photography - LETTERS - NEWS NOTES – Dorrit Hoffleit - OBSERVER´S PAGE Safe and Sane Methods of Observing the Sun Deep-Sky Wonders Coming Elongations of Mercury and Venus - STARS FOR OCTOBER - INDEX TO VOLUME XV FEATURE PICTURE: The waxing crescent moon, 4.6 days old. From a photograph made with the Lick 36-inch refractor on June 2, 1938, by J. H. Moore and J. F. Chappell. Lick Observatory photograph. --- NOVEMBER 1956 V. 16 Nº 1 COVER: The waning gibbous moon rising over Mt. Elden, Arizona, photographed by Arthur A. Hoag with the U. S. Naval Observatory 40-inch reflector at Flagstaff, on November 3, 1955. The atmospheric transparency and good seeing conditions are shown by the sharpness of the moon´s features, less than half a degree above the horizon. The tree line is nine miles distant. An Eastman 103a-E plate was used, with a Schott GC11 filter. Ufficial U. S. Navy photograph. - COLOR LANTERN SLIDES FROM PALOMAR OBSERVATORY - THE FLAGSTAFF STATION OF THE U. S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY – John S. Hall and Arthur A. Hoag - THE FIRST DETERMINATIONS OF STELLAR PARALLAX – I – Otto Struve - A CALIFORNIA GAUGER OF STAR CLUSTERS – John Irwin - FLAGSTAFF IS SCENE OF WESTERN CONVENTION - AT LOWELL OBSERVATORY - AT BARRINGER METEORITE CRATER - THE WANING CRESCENT MOON - BULLETIN FOR VISUAL OBSERVERS OF SATELLITES – Nº 3 - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS Mars´Approach Attacts Record Crowds - BOOKS AND THE SKY Between the Planets Meteors The Stars by Clock and Fist - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s The Custer 12 ½-inch Springfield Reflector – I Figuring a Parabolic Mirror by Thermal Deformation - NEWS NOTES - OBSERVER´S PAGE Program Notes for the Lunar Eclipse Photographing the Lunar Eclipse Deep-Sky Wonders - SKY AND TEACHER The NSF Summer Institute on Astronomy - SOUTHERN STARS - STARS FOR NOVEMBER FEATURE PICTURE: The waning crescent moon, 24.3 days old, from a photograph made with the Lick 36-inch refractor on August 20, 1938, by J. H. Moore and J. F. Chappell. Lick Observatory photograph. --- JANUARY 1957 V. 16 Nº 3 COVER: This sketch depicts one of the fast Schmidt-type cameras that will be used for precise photographic tracking of artificial satellites during the International Geophysical Year. Its optics have been designed by James G. Baker and its mechanical features by Joseph Nunn. Twelve of these 20-inch aperture f/1 instruments will be operated in many parts of the world by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, under the inmediate supervisor of Karl G. Henize. - SKY SURVEY BY 48-INCH SCHMIDT CAMERA COMPLETED - THE BAKER-NUNN SATELLITE-TRACKING CAMERA – Karl C. Henize - AMATEURS PHOTOGRAPH THE LUNAR ECLIPSE - THE HYDROGEN SPHERES IN CYGNUS – Otto Struve - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - GRAPHIC TIME TABLE OF THE HEAVENS – 1957 – Maryland Academy of Sciences - A GUIDE TO ASTRONOMICAL EQUIPMENT - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS Mountain States Region Added to Astronomical League - BOOKS AND THE SKY Gaseous Nebulae Earth Satellites - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s The Custer 12 1/2 – inch Springfield Reflector – III - LETTERS - NEWS NOTES - OBSERVER´S PAGE Observations of the November Total Eclipse of the Moon Auroral Observations Venus-Jupiter Conjunction Observed October 25th Deep-Sky Wonders - SKY AND TEACHER Astronomy as a Scout Program - SOUTHERN STARS - STARS FOR JANUARY FEATURE PICTURE: The Milky Way in Cygnus, from a mosaic of photographs in red light taken with the 48-inch Schmidt telescope on Palomar Mountain. Nebulosities bright and dark overlie great star clouds in this spectacular view of the Northern Cross and its surroundings. Copyright National Geographic-Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. --- FEBRUARY 1957 V. 16 Nº 4 COVER: The antenna of the Ohio State University radio telescope, used to make the 1.2-meter radio map of the sky on page 160 of this issue. It consists of 96 helices, mounted on a massive steel framework 160 feet long, which is pivoted on a horizontal east-west axis. The antenna can be pointed to any declination between – 40º and +90º; the meridian transit intrumet, it sweeps the sky as the earth rotates. Ohio State University photograph. - VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR AURORAL OBSERVATIONS - A RADIO MAP OF THE SKY AT 1.2 METERS – H. C. Ko and J. D. Kraus - GALAXIES AND THEIR INTERACTIONS – Otto Struve - A HOLLOW METEOR TRAIN – Gerald S. Hawkins - SATELLITE-TRACKING PRACTICE IN A PLANETARIUM – Richard H. Emmons - A PIONEER IN CANADIAN ASTRONOMY – Ruth J. Northcott - BY-PRODUCTS OF THE SEARCH FOR NATURAL SATELLITES OF THE EARTH – Charles F. Capen , Jr. - WHY DID THE ARABS CALL BETA PERSEI “AL-GHUL”? – George A. Davis - BULLETIN FOR VISUAL OBSERVERS OF SATELLITES – No. 5 - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS - ASTRONOMICAL SCRAPBOOK Two Unusual Occultations Observed in 1797 and 1978 - BOOKS AND THE SKY Robert Hooke Ergebnisse und Probleme der Sonnenforschung - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s When Is an Accurate Sagitta Formula Important? - NEWS NOTES - OBSERVER´S PAGE Another Look at Algol Size of the Earth´s Shadow During the November Lunar Eclipse - STARS FOR FEBRUARY --- MARCH 1957 V. 16 Nº 5 COVER: A time-exposure photograph of the stars around the north pole of the sky, taken by W. S. Warren, at Austin, Texas. During the nearly five hours that the shutter of his stationary camera remained open, the rotation of the earth caused the stars to describe this pattern of circular arcs. (See story on this page.) - AN ALL-STAR PROGRAM - PLANETARY NEBULAE – I – Otto Struve - AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OBSERVATORY – Owen Gingerich - THE LOCAL SYSTEM – George S. Miumford, III - SOME OBSERVATIONS OF MARS IN 1956 – Thomas R. Cave, Jr. - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - A SWEDISH CHART OF THE PHOTOGRAPHIC MILKY WAY - AMATEUR ATRONOMERS Monte Sano Observatory Completed in Alabama - BOOKS AND THE SKY Astronomical Optics and Related Subjects Rockets and Guided Missiles How to Make and Use a Telescope Die Mondfinsternisse - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s A Cassegrainian-Maksutov Telescope Design for the Amateur - NEWS NOTES - OBSERVER´S PAGE A Bright Camet Due in the Spring SKy The Buried Treasure of Monoceros - PLANETARIUM NOTES - SOUTHERN STARS - STARS FOR MARCH --- APRIL 1957 V. 16 Nº 6 COVER: The famous American astronomer, Henry Norris Russell (1877-1957) who died on February 18th. He made outstanding contributions to astrophysics, being uniquely influential among his fellow researchers. For more than four decades he was a highly simulating teacher of astronomy at Pinceton University. He was the senior author of the classic astronomical textbook, Astronomy, by Russell, Dugan, and Stewanrt. - DEAN OF AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS – Harlow Shapley - PLANETARY NEBULAE – II – Otto Struve - MARS SYMPOSIUM - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - THE TRANSIT OF MERCURY IN MAY - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS Juniors Hold Symposium in New York City National MOONWATCH Committee Meets at Smithsonian Observatory Headquarters - ASTRONOMICAL SCRAPBOOK The Field of Mizar and Alcor - BOOKS AND THE SKY The Changing Universe A Space Traveler´s Guide to Mars The Stars: Steppingstones into Space Atomic Energy - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s An Antidiffraction Mask for Reflectors An All-Weather Telescope A Vibration-Proof Mounting Support A Bowling-Ball Mounting - HERE AND THERE WITH AMATEURS - LETTERS - NEWS NOTES - OBSERVER´S PAGE The Solar Eclipse of April 29-30, 1957 Comet News Deep-Sky Wonders An Austrian Amateur Photographs a Bright Meteor Saturn to Occult a Star - QUESTIONS - STARS FOR APRIL --- MAY 1957 V. 16 Nº 7 COVER: This picture of the sun´s surface and limb was taken by Leon G. Salanave from Junipero Serra Peak in California, 5,862 feet above sea level. It was made at 7:05 a.m. PST on September 4, 1956, when seeing conditions were excellent, as is indicated by the extreme sharpness of the sun´s edge. Very close to the limb, a greatly foreshortened spot gives the appearance of a depression in the solar photosphere. In the lower part of the field a large sunspot group has bright plages associated with it. The scale of the reproduction is about one millimeter to two seconds of arc; the exposure was 1/150 second with a 6 ½-inch refractor, Herschel wedge, and enlarging camera. California Academy of Sciences photograph. - A RADIO OBSERVATORY IN THE OWENS VALLEY - AN ASTRONOMER LOOKS AT SPACE TRAVEL – Victor M. Blanco - AN IGY PROGRAM OF METEOR OBSERVING FOR AMATEURS - Peter M. Millman - OBSERVING AT JUNIPERO SERRA PEAK – Leon G. Salanave - SOME RECENT WORK ON THE ORION NEBULA – Otto Struve - VISUAL AURORA OBSERVING DURING THE IGY – D. S. Kimball and C. W. Gartlein - BULLETIN FOR VISUAL OBSERVERS OF SATELLITES – Nº 6 - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS - BOOKS AND THE SKY Atoms and the Universe Geometrical Optics - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s A Split-Ring Mounting for a 12-inch Reflector A 12-inch Dall-Kirkham An Inexpensive Reflector - NEWS NOTES - OBSERVER´S PAGE The Widespread Aurora of March 1- 2 Comet Arend-Roland The Eclipse of the Moon on May 13th Deep-Sky Wonders - QUESTIONS - SOUTHERN STARS - STARS FOR MAY FEATURE PICTURE: The Great Nebula in Orion, from a negative made with the 36-inch Crossley reflector, by N. U. Mayall on January 17, 1939. Lick Observatory photograph. --- JUNE 1957 V. 16 Nº 8 COVER: Comet Arend-Roland, as it appeared from an altitude of about 7,000 feet in the mountains east of Los Angeles, California, on the evening of April 24th. The picture was taken by Alan McClure, a member of the Los Angeles Astronomical Society, with an Aero-Xenar lens of 320 millimeters focal length, apertura 80 millimeters. The camera was set on a small equatorial mounting with electric clock drive and slow motions, guided through a 3-inch refractor. The exposure was for 10 minutes, from 7:47 to 7: 57 p.m. Pacific standard time. The enlargement from the 4-by-5-inch negative (emolution Kodak 103a-E) is nearly 2 ½ times in this reproduction. - COMET AREND-ROLAND IS WIDELY OBSERVED - A SOIL SURVEY AROUND THE BARRINGER CRATER – John S. Rinehart - THE CLASSIFICATION OF METEORITES - Frederick C. Leonard - THE FUNDAMENTAL PARTICLES OF PHYSICS - Arthur H. Snell - ABOUT A RUSSIAN ASTRONOMER - Otto Struve - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS An Observatory with an Artistc Touch - ASTRONOMICAL SCRAPBOOK Roger Boscovich and the Moon´s Atmosphere - BOOKS AND THE SKY Antartica in the International Geophysical Year The Sun Dictionary of Photography - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s A Portable Instrument for Astrophotography Testing Uncoated Mirrors on Double Stars - NEWS NOTES - OBSERVER´S PAGE Deep-Sky Wonders - QUESTIONS - STARS FOR JUNE FEATURE PICTURE: The great Barringer meteorite cráter in Arizona, photographed by Air Force observers. The view is from east at the bottom to west at the top, where Canyon Diablo appears as a winding crack in the arid of Two Guns. On the north rim of the crater (right foreground) is seen the new museum. This picture shows some of the area around the crater surveyed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory expedition described on page 366. U. S. Air Force photograph. --- JULY 1957 V. 16 Nº 9 COVER: This striking photograph of Comet 1956h (Arend-Roland) was taken on May 2-3, at midnight Eastern standard time, by a a New York City amateur, Charles Cuevas, who had traveled to near Bethpage. Long Island, seeking a darker sky. He used and f/2.5 Aero-Ektar lens of 7-inch focal length for this unguided 20-second exposure on Kodak Royal-X Pan film. With binoculars, Mr. Cuevas estimated the comet´s brightness as magnitude 3.5. - INTERNATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL YEAR BEGINS - PHOTO ALBUM – COMET AREND-ROLAND - THE SPECTRUM OF BETA LYRAE – Otto Struve - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - COMMENTS ON THE SUNWARD TAIL OF COMET AREND-ROLAND – Fred L. Whipple - ANOTHER METEORITE CRATER IN AUSTRALIA? – Ralph L. Sangster - BULLETIN FOR VISUAL OBSERVERS OF SATELLITES – Nº 7 - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS Northeast Convention Is Held at New Haven Western Amateur Astronomers to Meet in Berkeley Further News About the Kansas City Convention - BOOKS AND THE SKY Spectroscopy at Radio and Microwave Frequencies The Milky Way New Horizons in Astronomy - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s Maksutov Telescope Notes How to Collimate a Refracting Telescope Collimating a Reflector in a Jiffy - NEWS NOTES - OBSERVER´S PAGE Observations of the May 5th Transit of Mercury Partial Solar Eclipse Observed in Northwest Deep-Sky Wonders - QUESTIONS - STARS FOR JULY --- AUGUST 1957 V. 16 Nº 10 COVER: This fine hedgerow prominence on the edge of the sun was photographed on September 20, 1956, with the 15-inch chromosphere camera at Sacramento Peak Observatory in New Mexico. The picture was obtained in red light, with a filter transmitting hydrogen-alpha radiation. On the orinal negative the solar image has a diameter of 9 ½ inches; here it is enlarged about eight times. Sacramento Peak Observatory photograph. - WORD FROM DOWN UNDER - SOME ADVANCES IN SOLAR RESEARCH – Donald H. Menzel - THE ORIGIN OF PLANETARY NEBULAE – Otto Struve - THE FIFTY BRIGHTEST STARS – Harold L. Johnson - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - CATALOGUER OF THE STARS – Francis P. Scott - CHILE´S NEW NATIONAL ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORY – Federico Rutlant - HUNTING FOR METEORITES - A SWEDISH AMATEUR´S PHOTOGRAPHIC SKY ATLAS - ABOUT SUNDIALS AND MOONDIALS – Hermann Egger - A PANORAMA ON THE MOON – Depicted by Chesley Bonestell - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS - ASTRONOMICAL SCRAPBOOK A South American Tragedy - BOOKS AND THE SKY Arizona´s Meteorite Cranter Scientific Uses of Earth Satellites Einfuhrung in die Optik der Atmosphare - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s A Porter-type Grinding Machine Gear Trains for Telescope Drives and Sidereal Clocks - LETTERS - NEWS NOTES - OBSERVER´S PAGE Amateur Photography of the Northern Lights Deep-Sky Wonders - QUESTIONS - SOUTHERN STARS - STARS FOR AUGUST --- OCTOBER 1957 V. 16 Nº 12 COVER: The bright northern lights on the morning of August 6, 1957, were photographed from Pittsburgh, Pensylvania, by Walter A. Feibelman, a 15-second exposure at 4:25 Eastern daylight time. Note the draperies near the horizon. Just to the left of the bright vertical bundle of rays and above the wires is the star Dobhe (Alpha Ursae Majoris). Four others of the seven bright stars of the Big Dipper appear below and to the left, and Mizar and Alcor are at the extreme left. - NAMING THE COMET - COMET 1957D-AN UNEXPECTED VISITOR - ECLIPSE ISLANDS OF THE SOUTH PACIFIC – Frank M. Bateson - STELLAR SPECTROGRAPHS – II – Otto Struve - CLASSIFICATION, DIMENSIONS ,AND DISTANCES OF BRIGHT SOUTHERN GALAXIES – Gerard de Vaucouleurs - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS Telescope Makers Meet at Stellafane - ASTRONOMICAL SCRAPBOOK The Problem of Visual Observations of Venus - BOOKS AND THE SKY The Modern Universe Realities of Space Travel - GLEANING FOR ATM´s Some Amateur Mountings of Special Interest - NEWS NOTES - OBSERVER´S PAGE The Path of Comet 1957d Auroras in August - PLANETARIUM NOTES - QUESTIONS - STARS FOR OCTOBER - INDEX TO VOLUME XVI FEATURE PICTURE: The largest optical telescope in the world is the great 200-inch Hale reflector on Palomar Mountain in California. This drawing is one of a famous series by Russell W. Porter, the amateur telescope maker and artist whose abilities were so esteemed that he served by invitation as a consultant during the lengthy and difficult period of designing and building this great instrument. --- NOVEMBER 1957 V. 17 Nº 1 COVER: The Universtity of Illinois Observatory, located on the campus at Urbana, Illinois. It houses a 12-inch Warner and Swasey refractor. The building has recently been enlarged, as described in the adjoining column on this page. - ASTRONOMY AT ILLINOIS - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - A SEEING COMPENSATOR EMPLOYING TELEVISION TECHNIQUES – John H. DeWitt, Robert H. Hardie, and Carl K. Seyfert - A PROBABLE METEORITE FALL IN BRAZIL – Vincent Menezes - ARTIFICIAL SATELLITE NO. 1 - THE GREAT AURORA OF SEPTEMBER 22-23 – James E. McDonald - THE MOST MASSIVE STARS KNOWN – Otto Struve - DOUBLE STAR STUDIES IN INDONESIA - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS Kansas City Convention Marks League´s First Decade - BOOKS AND THE SKY Light Scattering by Small Particles Discoveries and Opinions of Galileo The Life of Arthur Stanley Eddington Optics: The Sciences of Vision - CELESTIAL CALENDAR - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s A New Test for Cassegrainian Secondaries A Versatile Observing Setup with an 8-inch Reflector - LETTERS - NEWS NOTES - OBSERVER´S PAGE The Lunar Eclipse of November 7th Deep-Sky Wonders September Aurorae - QUESTIONS - SOUTHERN STARS - STARS FOR NOVEMBER --- DECEMBER 1957 V. 17 Nº 2 COVER: The rocker case of the first Russian artificial satellite, seen descending in the southeast on the morning of October 16, 1957. The one-minute exposure began at 5:03 a.m. Eastern standard time, and was made by John Gregory, Springdale, Connecticut, with a special 3-inch f/1.5 Perkin-Elmer aerial reconnaissance lens stopped to f/3. The film was Royal-X Pan, developed four minutes in DK-60a. The bright star at the left is Alpha Hydrae (Alphard), and the rocket´s trail passed close to the star 12 Hydrae. - ANOTHER RUSSIAN SATELLITE - THE FIRST MAN-MADE SATELLITES - AMERICAN ASTRONOMERS REPORT - CLEVELAND´S LARGE SCHMIDT TELESCOPE MOVED – Victor M. Blanco - CELESTIAL MECHANICS OF ARTIFICIAL SATELLITES – Theodore E. Sterne - LICK´S 120-INCH MIRROR GETS FINAL TOUCHES - EXCHANGE OF MASS IN CLOSE BINARIES – Otto Struve - AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS Variable Star Observers Meet at Amherst Miami Amateurs Televise the Moon - ASTRONOMICAL SCRAPBOOK Naming Some Minor Planets - BOOKS AND SKY Discovery of the Universe Theories of the Universe Galactic Nebulae and Interstellar Matter Le Ciel et la Terre - CELESTIAL CALENDAR - GLEANINGS FOR ATM´s An 11-inch Maksutov Telescope A Vacuum Film Container - NEWS NOTES - OBSERVER´S PAGE Some Notes on New and Recent Comets Saturn´s Occultation Observed Deep-Sky Wonders - QUESTIONS - SOUTHERN STARS - STARS FOR DECEMBER

Número Ingreso Código Base de Datos Ubicación Tipo # Ej. Status Devolución Reserva
1051341HR 520 ENE-MAY/JUL-NOV 1956 - ENE-AGO/OCT-DIC 1957 ST  Colección Mario Sotillo UCSP - Sucre Original 1Disponible  

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